Zoey

Mixed Breed

  • Photo of Zoey, a Beagle and American Pit Bull Terrier mix Photo of Zoey, a Beagle and American Pit Bull Terrier mix
    Big Bed All to Myself

“Zoey was rescued from a puppy mill in Tennessee. In her early weeks she flew all the way to the Big Apple. Now she lives in Massachusetts with her kitty siblings. Zoey loves pepperoni, sunbathing and naps.”

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Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

66.0% Beagle
25.2% American Pit Bull Terrier
8.8% Bulldog
Beagle Beagle
The Beagle is a scent hound and a great family pet. They are known for being affectionate and having loud voices.
Learn More
American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
Learn More
Bulldog Bulldog
Originally a bull-baiting dog, bulldogs today are gentle and loving while still carrying the stocky frame of their forbearers.
Learn More
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.1 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
58 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Zoey’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Beagle
American Pit Bull Terrier
Bulldog

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Beagle mix American Pit Bull Terrier / Beagle mix Beagle Beagle / Bulldog mix American Pit Bull Terrier Beagle Beagle Beagle Beagle Bulldog mix American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier Beagle Beagle

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Zoey’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Zoey is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

Primary Lens Luxation

Zoey inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Our research indicates that this genetic variant is likely to increase the risk that Zoey will develop this disease.

Scientific Basis

Research studies for this variant have been based on dogs of other breeds. While dogs with similar breeds to Zoey have not yet been the focus of research studies, our data indicates that Zoey is likely to be at increased risk.

What is Primary Lens Luxation?

PLL occurs when the lens spontaneously detaches from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity. Anterior lens luxation is when the lens falls forward and posterior lens luxation is when the lens falls backwards in the eye.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Factor VII Deficiency

Identified in Beagles

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Identified in Beagles

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1

Identified in Beagles

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy

Identified in Bulldogs

Glaucoma

Identified in Beagles

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and Bulldogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration

Identified in Beagles

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Hypocatalasia, Acatalasemia

Identified in Beagles

Cobalamin Malabsorption

Identified in Beagles

Musladin-Lueke Syndrome

Identified in Beagles

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Beagles

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Identified in Beagles

Additional Genetic Conditions


Clinical Tools

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have some white areas in coat
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely furnished (mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely light shedding
Coat Texture
Coat would likely be curly or wavy if long
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Likely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Zoey’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C1

Haplotype

C25

Map

C1

Zoey’s Haplogroup

Congratulations, C1 is a very exotic female lineage! It is more closely associated with maternal lineages found in wolves, foxes and jackals than with other dog lineages. So it seems dogs in this group have a common male dog ancestor who, many thousands of years ago, mated with a female wolf! This is not a common lineage in any breed, though a good number of German Shepherds and Doberman Pinchers are C1. It is also found in breeds as diverse as Peruvian Inca Orchids and Pekingese; it is rarely found amongst Labrador Retrievers, Border Collies, Siberian Huskies, or Cocker Spaniels. Despite its fascinating origins, it is widely distributed around the globe, and even shows up frequently among Peruvian village dogs. It almost certainly survived at low frequency in Europe for millennia and then was dispersed outside of Europe by colonialism, though not as successfully as some other lineages.

C25

Zoey’s Haplotype

Part of the C1 haplogroup, this haplotype has been spotted in village dogs in Peru and Namibia. Among breeds, it occurs most frequently in Doberman Pinschers, but has also been detected in German Shepherd Dogs and Labrador Retrievers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The C1 maternal line is commonly found in Jackals.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Zoey inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Zoey is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.