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Yuna

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Genetic Breed Result

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50.3% Gray Wolf
27.8% German Shepherd Dog
14.1% Alaskan Malamute
7.8% Siberian Husky
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Genetic Stats


Predicted Adult Weight

60 lbs Learn More

Genetic Age
46 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth you provided

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Gray Wolf
German Shepherd Dog
Alaskan Malamute
Siberian Husky

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Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
161
CLEAR
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Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) Activity result: Normal
Yuna has two normal alleles at ALT.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Yuna did not test positive for any of the genetic conditions that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Yuna’s diagnosis and treatment if she gets sick in the future.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Yuna is not a carrier for any of the genetic conditions that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Yuna tested clear for 13 genetic conditions that are common in her breed mix.
Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

Factor VII Deficiency
(F7 Exon 5)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Seen in Alaskan Malamutes, but not Yuna.

Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A
(F8 Exon 11, Shepherd Variant 1)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A
(F8 Exon 1, Shepherd Variant 2)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III (LAD3)
(FERMT3)
Blood

A rare disorder of white blood cells, this causes increased susceptibility to infections and bleeding tendencies. Affected dogs present with a history of persistent skin …

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

Achromatopsia
(CNGA3 Exon 7 German Shepherd Variant)
Eyes

This is a progressive, nonpainful disorder of the retina that affects color vision and light perception. Cone cells not only register color, they allow the dog to adjust …

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis
(SLC2A9)
Kidney and Bladder

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate; if caught early, it is responsive to dietary management. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabol…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

X-linked Ectodermal Dysplasia, Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia
(EDA Intron 8)
Multisystem

This developmental condition can cause a scanty haircoat, malformed teeth, and few or absent sweat glands. Because dogs only have sweat glands on their paw pads, they are…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis (RCND)
(FLCN Exon 7)
Multisystem

A multiorgan syndrome best described in the German Shepherd Dog, affected dogs display thick skin nodules and signs of kidney disease, and should be evaluated by a veteri…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome
(GUSB Exon 3)
Multisystem

A type of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause skeletal abnormalities, growth retardation, and gait abnormalities, and can require close monitoring and special measu…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

GM1 Gangliosidosis
(GLB1 Exon 15 Alaskan Husky Variant)
Multisystem

An early onset form of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause affected dogs to display neurologic signs as puppies or young adults. These include partial or total visi…

Seen in Siberian Huskys, but not Yuna.

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Yuna.

Polyneuropathy, NDRG1 Malamute Variant
(NDRG1 Exon 4)
Brain and Spinal Cord

Polyneuropathy is a progressive neurologic disease that causes peripheral nerve dysfunction. Peripheral nerves relay messages between the brain and spinal cord to the res…

Seen in Alaskan Malamutes, but not Yuna.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 148

Yuna is clear of 148 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Coat Color

Coat Color

E Locus (MC1R)
No dark hairs anywhere (ee)
K Locus (CBD103)
Not expressed (kyky)
A Locus (ASIP)
Not expressed (awaw)
D Locus (MLPH)
Not expressed (DD)
B Locus (TYRP1)
Likely black colored nose/feet (BB)
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings (RSPO2) LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows) (II)
Coat Length (FGF5)
Likely short or mid-length coat (GT)
Shedding (MC5R)
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding (CC)
Coat Texture (KRT71)
Coat would likely be curly or wavy if long (CT)
Hairlessness (FOXI3) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (SLC45A2) LINKAGE
Likely not albino (NN)
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length (BMP3)
Likely medium or long muzzle (CC)
Tail Length (T)
Likely normal-length tail (CC)
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
Unlikely to have hind dew claws (CC)
Blue Eye Color (ALX4) LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes (NN)
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size (IGF1)
Larger (NN)
Body Size (IGFR1)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (STC2)
Larger (TT)
Body Size (GHR - E195K)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (GHR - P177L)
Larger (CC)
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
Normal altitude tolerance (GG)

Through Yuna’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2

Haplotype

A29a

Map

A2

Yuna’s Haplogroup

A2 is a very ancient maternal line. Most likely it was one of the major female lines that contributed to the very first domesticated dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Some of the line stayed in Central Asia to the present day, and frequently appear as Tibetan Mastiffs and Akitas. Those that escaped the mountains of Central Asia sought out other cold spots, and are now found among Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. This lineage is also occasionally found in several common Western breeds, such as German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers. Curiously, all New Guinea Singing Dogs descend from this line. These are an ancient and very interesting breed found in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. Unfortunately, they are now endangered. They are closely related to the Australian dingo, so you could say its cousins are dingos! This line is also common in village dogs in Southeast and East Asia. Unlike many other lineages, A2 did not spread across the whole world, probably because it did not have the opportunity to hitch its wagon to European colonialism - or because these dogs just prefer hanging out in mountains, tundras, islands, and other hard-to-reach places!

A29a

Yuna’s Haplotype

Part of the A2 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Siberian Huskies, Alaskan Malamutes, Labrador Retrievers, and village dogs from Alaska.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dingos commonly possess this haplogroup.

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Yuna is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.