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Theia CGC TKA DJ

Mixed Breed

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“Theia is a dock diver, trick dog, and excellent snuggler.”

Instagram tag
@puposkypups

Location
Puposky, Minnesota, USA
From
Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA

This dog has been viewed 634 times and been given 5 wags

Registration

Microchip: 985112007597187

Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

67.2% Labrador Retriever
21.4% German Shorthaired Pointer
11.4% Pointer
Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever
The Labrador Retriever was bred for hunting and excelled in retrieving game after it was shot down. Known for its gentle disposition and loyalty, the Labrador Retriever has become a favorite of families and breeders alike.
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German Shorthaired Pointer German Shorthaired Pointer
German Shorthaired Pointers are highly intelligent and energetic hunting dogs, while being a very friendly and willing companion.
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Pointer Pointer
The Pointer is a hard-working bird dog that is happiest when on the hunt. This is a high-energy breed that will be more than a handful for first-time owners. When given a job and plenty of room to run around, the Pointer can make for a wonderful companion.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 0.6 % LOW Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 55 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 60 human years Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Theia’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Labrador Retriever
German Shorthaired Pointer
Pointer

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Changes to this dog’s profile
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  • On 1/21/2019 changed handle from "theia4" to "tildenstheia"

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Labrador Retriever mix Labrador Retriever mix Labrador Retriever German Shorthaired Pointer mix Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever / Pointer mix Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever German Shorthaired Pointer German Shorthaired Pointer mix Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever Pointer
Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Theia’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
168
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical traits

These genetic traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Normal
This result helps your vet understand what your dog's baseline ALT activity is. The enzyme alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, is commonly used to evaluate liver health. Do…
Theia has two normal alleles at ALT.

Not At Risk

Good news! Theia did not test positive for any of the genetic diseases that Embark screens for. Read on to learn more about the conditions we test for, but rest assured that Theia does not have the mutations known to cause them.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Theia’s diagnosis and treatment if she gets sick in the future. Many other diseases caused by environmental factors or undiscovered genetic variants can cause symptoms similar to diseases we test for. By ruling out these mutations, your veterinarian will be able to find the true cause more quickly. Your veterinarian will also know they can safely prescribe medications some dogs are sensitive to.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Theia is not a carrier for any of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Theia tested clear for 19 genetic conditions that are common in her breed mix.
Condition List

Von Willebrand Disease Type II
(VWF Exon 28)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Seen in German Shorthaired Pointers, Pointers, but not Theia.

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia
(TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant)
Blood

This is a benign disorder of platelet production that leads to abnormally large, sparse platelets. Affected dogs typically do not suffer any ill effects from the size or …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Canine Elliptocytosis
(SPTB Exon 30)
Blood

A benign disease that affects red blood cell shape, elliptocytosis rarely causes symptoms. Upon examination of a blood smear, however, affected dogs have elongated, oval …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency
(PKLR Exon 7 Labrador Variant)
Blood

This is a disease of red blood cells characterized by low energy level, jaundiced skin, and pale and cool extremities. Dogs affected with PKD have red blood cells that ha…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2
(TTC8)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1
(RPGRIP1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Achromatopsia
(CNGA3 Exon 7 Labrador Retriever Variant)
Eyes

This is a progressive, nonpainful disorder of the retina that affects color vision and light perception. Cone cells not only register color, they allow the dog to adjust …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Macular Corneal Dystrophy (MCD)
(CHST6)
Eyes

A disease of middle-aged dogs, MCD was first characterized in the Labrador Retriever. Affected dogs begin to show clouding of the eyes and visual impairment due to abnorm…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, German Shorthaired Pointers, Pointers, but not Theia.

Narcolepsy
(HCRTR2 Intron 6)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A neurologic condition characterized by daytime sleepiness and fragmented sleep cycles, affected dogs also exhibit episodes of cataplexy, a sudden complete loss of muscle…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy (HSAN), Acral Mutilation Syndrome
(GDNF-AS)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A rare condition affecting the ability to feel pain, HSAN has been diagnosed in French Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, English Pointers, and German Shorthaired Point…

Seen in German Shorthaired Pointers, Pointers, but not Theia.

Centronuclear Myopathy
(PTPLA)
Muscular

This muscle disorder is characterized by exercise intolerance, weight loss, and muscle wasting. While abnormal tendon reflexes can be observed as early as 1 month, the sy…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Exercise-Induced Collapse
(DNM1)
Muscular

First characterized in field-trial lines of Labrador Retriever dogs, this muscle disorder can cause episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes collapse; after recovering, …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Myotubular Myopathy 1, X-linked Myotubular Myopathy
(MTM1)
Muscular

This is a degenerative muscle disease first characterized in the Labrador Retriever. Affected dogs present as puppies with failure to thrive and weakness; this rapidly pr…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome
(COLQ)
Neuro-muscular

This is a non-progressive disease characterized by episodes of exercise intolerance and weakness; some forms have been shown to respond to medical treatment. Though it ha…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Hereditary Nasal Parakeratosis
(SUV39H2)
Skin & Connective Tissues

This condition causes the skin of the nose to be overly thick and shingle-like, which can be uncomfortable for your dog. HNPK isn't usually as upsetting to the dog as it …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Oculoskeletal Dysplasia 1, Dwarfism-Retinal Dysplasia
(COL9A3, Labrador Retriever)
Skeletal

A developmental disease described in the Labrador Retriever and the Samoyed, affected dogs can show signs very early in life and can include dramatic short-limbed dwarfis…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Skeletal Dysplasia 2
(COL11A2)
Skeletal

A disease of skeletal development, this causes dogs to have abnormally short legs but similar body lengths compared to unaffected dogs, and can be observed by the time do…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Theia.

Other Conditions: Clear of 149

Theia is clear of 149 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

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Family tree

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Coat Color

A number of genes are known to affect coat color in dogs, and they all interact. In some cases, other genetic effects may also influence color and pattern.

Trait
Result
 
E Locus (Mask, Grizzle, Recessive Red)
EmE
K Locus (Dominant Black)
KBKB
A Locus (Agouti, Sable)
atat
B Locus (Brown, Chocolate, Liver, Red, Dudley)
bb
Saddle Tan
II

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings, shedding and curls are all genetic! And they all interact, too. In fact, the combination of these genes explains the coat phenotypes of 90% of AKC registered dog breeds.

Trait
Result
 
Furnishings / Improper Coat (RSPO2)
II
Long Haircoat (FGF5)
GG
Shedding (MC5R)
CC
Curly Coat (KRT71)
CC
Hairlessness (FOXI3)
LINKAGE
N/N
Hairlessness (SGK3)
NN
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 - OCA2, Doberman Z Factor Albinism (SLC45A2)
LINKAGE
N/N

More information on coat type genetics: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2897713/figure/F3/

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Traits genes:

Other Body Features

Trait
Result
 
Brachycephaly (BMP3)
CC
Natural Bobtail (T)
CC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
CC
Blue Eye Color
LINKAGE
N/N

Body Size

Body size is a complex trait that is affected by both genetic and environmental variation. Our genetic analysis includes genes that, together, explain over 80% of the variation in dog body size. It does not account for runting or stunting; nor does it account for the interactions between various genes both known and unknown.

Trait
Result
 
Body Size - IGF1
NN
Body Size - IGF1R
GG
Body Size - STC2
TT
Body Size - GHR (E195K)
GG
Body Size - GHR (P177L)
CC

Performance

Trait
Result
 
Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
GG

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Family tree

Health

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Theia’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B1b

Map

B1

Theia’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B1b

Theia’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs across the world, including those from Central America, the Middle East, South Asia, and the French Polynesian Islands. Among the 31 breed dogs we see it in, we see it in Poodles, Otterhounds, and Labrador Retrievers. It is also our most commonly-sampled Golden Retriever haplotype!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Paternal Haplotype

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Theia is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

Explore:

Family tree

Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype