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Teddy

Mixed Ancestry

  • Teddy, an American Pit Bull Terrier and Labrador Retriever mix tested with EmbarkVet.com Teddy, an American Pit Bull Terrier and Labrador Retriever mix tested with EmbarkVet.com

“Teddy is originally from Texas where she found on the streets with her mom & 2 sisters. They made their way to MN when they got transferred from the Texas shelter to Benches in Mankato, MN & came to live with us at 8 weeks old. Decided to try and find out her breed because her mom & siblings look nothing alike (last photo in the gallery)! Likes - swimming, walks, her green ball and treats Dislikes - baths, car rides, the word “no” & storms”

Instagram tag
@teddy_girl26

Place of Birth

Texas, USA

Current Location

Mankato, Minnesota, USA

From

Mankato, MN, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 3 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

American Pit Bull Terrier

The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.

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Labrador Retriever

The Labrador Retriever was bred for hunting and excelled in retrieving game after it was shot down. Known for its gentle disposition and loyalty, the Labrador Retriever has become a favorite of families and breeders alike.

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German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.

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Great Pyrenees

The Great Pyrenees is an exceptionally loving dog whose primary function is to protect sheep, goats, livestock, people, children, grass, flowers, the moon, lawn furniture, etc., from any real or imaginary predators that may intrude on your personal space. They have a strong build and an amazing thick white coat that exudes elegance and majesty. They make a great family dog because of their intelligence and steady temperament.

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Chow Chow

This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. Often aloof and suspicious of strangers, the Chow Chow may not be a cuddle buddy, but for the right person, they are a fiercely loyal companion.

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American Staffordshire Terrier

American Staffordshire Terriers are powerful but playful dogs that are both loyal and affectionate with their owners.

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Cocker Spaniel

Cocker Spaniels are handsome and intelligent hunting dogs that are also well-suited to life as a loving family pet.

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Dogs Like Teddy

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Teddy. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
American Pit Bull Terrier
Labrador Retriever
German Shepherd Dog
Great Pyrenees
Chow Chow
American Staffordshire Terrier
Cocker Spaniel
Supermutt

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Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 6/16/2020 changed handle from "teddy860" to "teddygirl2"
Here’s what Teddy’s family tree may have looked like.
Teddy
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS American Pit Bull Terrier mix Mixed American Pit Bull Terrier Chow Chow / American Staffordshire Terrier mix Labrador Retriever / German Shepherd Dog mix Great Pyrenees / Cocker Spaniel mix American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier Chow Chow American Staffordshire Terrier mix Labrador Retriever German Shepherd Dog Great Pyrenees Cocker Spaniel mix
While there may be other possible configurations of her family’s relationships, this is the most likely family tree to explain Teddy’s breed mix.
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Health Summary

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Teddy inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

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Teddy inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This variant should not impact Teddy’s health. This variant is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that a dog needs two copies of the variant to show signs of this condition. Teddy is unlikely to develop this condition due to this variant because she only has one copy of the variant.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd?

PRA-prcd is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of rod cells, leading to night blindness before day blindness.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III, CLAD III

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Elliptocytosis

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Type I

Identified in Great Pyrenees

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Platelet Factor X Receptor Deficiency, Scott Syndrome

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2, GR-PRA2

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Day Blindness

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Day Blindness

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy, cmr1

Identified in Great Pyrenees

Macular Corneal Dystrophy, MCD

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, and more

Familial Nephropathy

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome, MPS VII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Glycogen storage disease Type VII, Phosphofructokinase Deficiency, PFK Deficiency

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Alexander Disease

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs, Great Pyrenees, and more

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Narcolepsy

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Acral Mutilation Syndrome

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Centronuclear Myopathy, CNM

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Exercise-Induced Collapse, EIC

Identified in Cocker Spaniels and Labrador Retrievers

X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome, CMS

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Hereditary Nasal Parakeratosis, HNPK

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Skeletal Dysplasia 2, SD2

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Traits

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Teddy’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A22

Map

A1e

Teddy’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A22

Teddy’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we see this haplotype in Bernese Mountain Dogs, German Shepherd Dogs, Great Danes, and village dogs in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Teddy inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Teddy is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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