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Stewart

Mixed Breed

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“He is a lovable rescue from Samoyed/mix who has been diabetic for 10 years. He is 13 as of 7/31/19. He was trained as therapy dog, then retrained as physical assist service dog. He is famous on fb & instagram as a celebrity dog. He helps spread awareness about canine diabetes around the world @stewartthediabeticdog. He is 80 lbs. I will share his genetic information with his followers. I want better insight into his health, so I can help keep him optimal. He is greatly loved by the world.”

Place of Birth

Concord, Ohio, USA

Current Location

Willoughby, Ohio, USA

From

Concord, Ohio, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 2 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Samoyed

A working breed, the Samoyed can be strong-willed at times, but above all they remain friendly, gentle, and devoted family dogs. The Samoyed was originally bred to hunt, haul sledges, and herd reindeer. Among the breed’s duties: pack hiking, tracking, and warming their owners by sleeping on top of them at night.

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American Pit Bull Terrier

The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.

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American Staffordshire Terrier

American Staffordshire Terriers are powerful but playful dogs that are both loyal and affectionate with their owners.

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Boxer

Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dog: patient, loyal and smart-requiring lots of exercise and proper training. For active families or owners looking for a rambunctious jogging buddy, Boxers may be the perfect breed. Boxers delight their humans with their sense of humor and affectionate nature.

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Rottweiler

Originally used for driving cattle and protecting valuable convoys, Rottweilers are now popular family pets as well as guard, police and military dogs.

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English Cocker Spaniel (Working Type)

English Cockers are a medium-size dog with long ears and a happy disposition. The name Cocker comes from their use to hunt woodcock in England, although English Cockers have been used to hunt many other types of birds as well. They make great companion dogs for people who can give them the exercise they need. A field-bred cocker spaniel is first and foremost an upland flushing dog, bred for skills like hup, retrieve to hand, quarter, follow hand signals, and steady.

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Golden Retriever

Developed as an ideal hunting retriever, the Golden Retriever's eagerness to please and friendliness has made them an extremely popular family pet.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

2.8 % HIGH

Predicted Adult Weight

59 lbs

Genetic Age
115 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

Dogs Like Stewart

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Stewart. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Samoyed
American Pit Bull Terrier
American Staffordshire Terrier
Boxer
Rottweiler
English Cocker Spaniel (Working Type)
Golden Retriever

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Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

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Stewart
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Samoyed American Pit Bull Terrier / American Staffordshire Terrier mix Boxer / Rottweiler mix Samoyed Samoyed American Pit Bull Terrier American Staffordshire Terrier mix Boxer mix Rottweiler mix Samoyed Samoyed Samoyed Samoyed

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Stewart’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Stewart inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

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Stewart inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Degenerative Myelopathy, DM?

The dog equivalent of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, DM is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord. Because the nerves that control the hind limbs are the first to degenerate, the most common clinical signs are back muscle wasting and gait abnormalities.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Hemophilia A

Identified in Boxers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Working-type English Cocker Spaniels and Golden Retrievers

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 1, GR-PRA1

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2, GR-PRA2

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

X-Linked Progressive Retinal Atrophy 1, XL-PRA1

Identified in Samoyeds

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

X-Linked Hereditary Nephropathy, XLHN

Identified in Samoyeds

Autosomal Recessive Hereditary Nephropathy, Familial Nephropathy, ARHN

Identified in Working-type English Cocker Spaniels

Glycogen storage disease Type VII, Phosphofructokinase Deficiency, PFK Deficiency

Identified in Working-type English Cocker Spaniels

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 5, NCL 5

Identified in Golden Retrievers

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Juvenile Laryngeal Paralysis and Polyneuropathy

Identified in Rottweilers

Acral Mutilation Syndrome

Identified in Working-type English Cocker Spaniels

Muscular Dystrophy

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Exercise-Induced Collapse

Identified in Working-type English Cocker Spaniels

Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Ichthyosis, ICH1

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Identified in Working-type English Cocker Spaniels

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Red Pigment Intensity LINKAGE
I (Intensity) Loci
No impact on coat pattern
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have large white areas in coat
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation
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Through Stewart’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A18

Map

A1b

Stewart’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A18

Stewart’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1b haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs in Central and South America, as well as French Polynesia. Among the breeds we have detected it in, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Lhasa Apsos, and Pugs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

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Through Stewart’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C

Haplotype

Hb.3

Map

C

Stewart’s Haplogroup

C is a relatively rare paternal lineage. The dog populations which bear C are a disparate bunch. The Akita and Shiba Inu are Japanese breeds, the former of which seems to have roots in the Jomon population of hunter-gatherers which were present in the islands of Japan before the ancestors of the modern Japanese arrived. The New Guinea Singing Dog, Samoyed, and Alaska Malamute are all disparate breeds that also represent the C lineage. One village dog from Peru also bore this lineage. This wide distribution and diversity suggest C is not a recently expanded lineage. It likely represents a canid lineage which diversified sometime around the Last Glacial Maximum, when the dogs of Siberia and Oceania split off and went their separate ways.

Hb.3

Stewart’s Haplotype

Part of the C haplogroup, we have spotted this haplotype in village dogs in Peru. In breed dogs, this haplotype is confined to the Samoyed and Keeshond, making it a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The Shiba Inu descends from this relativey rare haplogroup.

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