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“Cash”
Sonata Vivant et Lisse Big Spender CGC

Belgian Shepherd

“Loves to chase leaves blowing on the ground!”

Current Location
Phoenix, AZ, USA

This dog has been viewed 220 times and been given 0 wags

Registration

American Kennel Club: DN52104401

Genetic Breed Result

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Belgian Shepherd

100.0% Belgian Tervuren
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Genetic Stats


Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
28 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Belgian Tervuren

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Health Summary

Cash has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

Cash inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Cash has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Cash's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Cash’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the blood stream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome, MPS VII (GUSB Exon 3)

Identified in Belgian Tervurens and Belgian Shepherds

Spongy Degeneration with Cerebellar Ataxia 1 (KCNJ10)

Identified in Belgian Tervurens and Belgian Shepherds

Spongy Degeneration with Cerebellar Ataxia 2 (ATP1B2)

Identified in Belgian Tervurens and Belgian Shepherds

Additional Genetic Conditions

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Coat Color

Coat Color

E Locus (MC1R)
Can have a melanistic mask (EmEm)
K Locus (CBD103)
More likely to have a patterned haircoat (kyky)
A Locus (ASIP)
Fawn Sable coat color pattern (ayay)
D Locus (MLPH)
Dark areas of hair and skin are not lightened (DD)
B Locus (TYRP1)
Black or gray hair and skin (BB)
Saddle Tan (RALY)
Not expressed (NN)
M Locus (PMEL)
No merle alleles (mm)
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings (RSPO2) LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows) (II)
Coat Length (FGF5)
Likely long coat (TT)
Shedding (MC5R)
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding (CT)
Coat Texture (KRT71)
Likely straight coat (CC)
Hairlessness (FOXI3) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Hairlessness (SGK3)
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (SLC45A2) LINKAGE
Likely not albino (NN)
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length (BMP3)
Likely medium or long muzzle (CC)
Tail Length (T)
Likely normal-length tail (CC)
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
Likely to have hind dew claws (CT)
Blue Eye Color (ALX4) LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes (NN)
Back Muscling & Bulk, Large Breed (ACSL4)
Likely normal muscling (CC)
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size (IGF1)
Larger (NN)
Body Size (IGFR1)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (STC2)
Larger (TT)
Body Size (GHR - E191K)
Smaller (AA)
Body Size (GHR - P177L)
Larger (CC)
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
Normal altitude tolerance (GG)
Appetite (POMC) LINKAGE
Normal food motivation (NN)

Through Cash’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A11a

Map

A1d

Sonata Vivant et Lisse Big Spender’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A11a

Sonata Vivant et Lisse Big Spender’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs in village dogs all over the world. Among the 23 breeds we have sampled it in, the most common occurrences include Rottweilers, English Setters, English Springer Spaniels, and wirehaired pointing griffons.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

Through Cash’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

Ha.4

Map

A1b

Sonata Vivant et Lisse Big Spender’s Haplogroup

For most of dog history, this haplogroup was probably quite rare. However, a couple hundred years ago it seems to have found its way into a prized male guard dog in Europe who had many offspring, including the ancestors of many European guard breeds such as Doberman Pinchers, St. Bernards, and Great Danes. Despite being rare, many of the most imposing dogs on Earth have it; strangely, so do many Pomeranians! Perhaps this explains why some Poms are so tough, acting like they're ten times their actual size! This lineage is most commonly found in working dogs, in particular guard dogs. With origins in Europe, it spread widely across other regions as Europeans took their dogs across the world.

Ha.4

Sonata Vivant et Lisse Big Spender’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype is found in village dogs in North America and Africa. As for breeds, it occurs most frequently in Miniature Pinscher, Great Dane, and Poodle.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Great Danes and Pomeranians have this in common!