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Snoopy

Mixed Breed

“Snoopy came to us when he was already a year old - he is now about 8 years old. He is one of the sweetest dogs we have ever met and nobody has been able to prove us wrong. He is loving and trusting and has changed our lives for the better - we think he feels the same way.”

Location
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

This dog has been viewed 500 times and been given 13 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

50.0% American Pit Bull Terrier
42.3% Beagle
7.7% Cocker Spaniel
American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
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Beagle Beagle
The Beagle is a scent hound and a great family pet. They are known for being affectionate and having loud voices.
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Cocker Spaniel Cocker Spaniel
Cocker Spaniels are handsome and intelligent hunting dogs that are also well-suited to life as a loving family pet.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness:

0.9 % MEDIUM

Predicted Adult Weight:

46 lbs

Genetic Age:

70 human years

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Snoopy’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
American Pit Bull Terrier
Beagle
Cocker Spaniel

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Snoopy’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
168
CLEAR
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Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) Activity result: Low Normal

Snoopy has one copy of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Snoopy has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Snoopy is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Snoopy’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Snoopy did not test positive for any of the genetic diseases that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Snoopy’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Snoopy is not a carrier for any of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Snoopy tested clear for 21 genetic conditions that are common in his breed mix.
Condition List

Factor VII Deficiency
(F7 Exon 5)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia
(TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant)
Blood

This is a benign disorder of platelet production that leads to abnormally large, sparse platelets. Affected dogs typically do not suffer any ill effects from the size or …

Seen in Cocker Spaniels, but not Snoopy.

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency
(PKLR Exon 7 Beagle Variant)
Blood

This is a disease of red blood cells characterized by low energy level, jaundiced skin, and pale and cool extremities. Dogs affected with PKD have red blood cells that ha…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Cocker Spaniels, but not Snoopy.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd1
(PDE6B)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, but not Snoopy.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd2
(IQCB1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, but not Snoopy.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1
(RPGRIP1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Glaucoma
Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (ADAMTS10 Exon 17)
Eyes

A disease that affects humans and dogs alike; this is an adult-onset, medically manageable condition that causes high intraocular pressure (IOP). If left untreated, it ca…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis
(SLC2A9)
Kidney and Bladder

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate; if caught early, it is responsive to dietary management. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabol…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, but not Snoopy.

Autosomal Recessive Hereditary Nephropathy, Familial Nephropathy
(COL4A4 Exon 3)
Kidney and Bladder

This condition causes inappropriate loss of protein in the urine, which leads to muscle wasting, abnormal fluid accumulation in the skin and limbs, and excessive thirst a…

Seen in Cocker Spaniels, but not Snoopy.

Glycogen storage disease Type VII, Phosphofructokinase deficiency
(PFKM Whippet and English Springer Spaniel Variant)
Multisystem

Affecting an enzyme required for red blood cell and skeletal muscle cell energy production, phosphofructokinase (PFK) deficiency causes red blood cells and skeletal muscl…

Seen in Cocker Spaniels, but not Snoopy.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia - NCL-A
(ARSG Exon 2)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, but not Snoopy.

Cerebellar Abiotrophy, Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration
(SPTBN2)
Brain and Spinal Cord

Known as the “oldest” (even reptiles and more ancient species have them!) part of the brain, the cerebellum fine-tunes motor signals from the brain to the muscles, allowi…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, but not Snoopy.

Fetal-Onset Neonatal Neuroaxonal Dystrophy
(MFN2)
Brain and Spinal Cord

This group of diseases center around the neuronal axon, a specialized cellular structure that helps our nervous systems relay information across great distances. Remember…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy (HSAN), Acral Mutilation Syndrome
(GDNF-AS)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A rare condition affecting the ability to feel pain, HSAN has been diagnosed in French Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, English Pointers, and German Shorthaired Point…

Seen in Cocker Spaniels, but not Snoopy.

Exercise-Induced Collapse
(DNM1)
Muscular

First characterized in field-trial lines of Labrador Retriever dogs, this muscle disorder can cause episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes collapse; after recovering, …

Seen in Cocker Spaniels, but not Snoopy.

Hypocatalasia, Acatalasemia
(CAT)
Metabolic

This condition causes no ill effects in the majority of dogs; however, some dogs can suffer from mouth ulcers leading to difficulty eating and increased susceptibility to…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Imerslund-Grasbeck Syndrome, Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption
(CUBN Exon 8)
Gastrointestinal

This is a treatable gastrointestinal disease where dogs cannot absorb cobalamin, often causing them to be runty with poor energy levels. Cobalamin is required for synthes…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Musladin-Lueke Syndrome
(ADAMTSL2)
Skin & Connective Tissues

First characterized in the Beagle, this condition causes abnormally strong connections between the structural proteins that provide strength and integrity to tissues like…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Brittle Bone Disease
(COL1A2)
Skeletal

A disease of bone strength and flexibilty, affected dogs often present to the vet for spontaneous bone fractures, tooth fractures and loss, and joint pain; these symptoms…

Seen in Beagles, but not Snoopy.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 147

Snoopy is clear of 147 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Intermediate
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance

Through Snoopy’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A248

Map

A1d

Snoopy’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A248

Snoopy’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, this haplotype has been detected in village dogs in French Polynesia and Colombia. Among breeds, it occurs in Jack Russell Terriers, Fox Terrier Wires, and Cocker Spaniels.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

Through Snoopy’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

H7

Map

D

Snoopy’s Haplogroup

The D paternal lineage is very common in well-known populations of dogs. Breeds belonging to the D lineage likely have direct male ancestors that can be traced all the way back to the origin of domestic dogs themselves! One popular breed that commonly sports a D lineage is the Boxer. Boxers were developed in the late 19th century from Mastiff dogs, so it is no surprise that D is well represented among Mastiffs, Bulldogs, as well as Terriers. Intriguingly, D is also found among Lhasa Apsos, an ancient Tibetan breed, and Afghan Hounds. While the presence of this lineage in Polynesia or the New World can be chalked up to interbreeding with European dogs brought during voyages of discovery or later settlement, D is also well represented among village dog populations in the Middle East and Africa. If the fact that we find dogs bearing a D lineage in the Middle East (not to mention the large amount of diversity among Middle Eastern D lineage males) is any indication of ancient residence in that region, then the presence among Oceanian village dogs is peculiar. Rather, it may be that D is part of a broader Eurasian group of ancient paternal lineages which disappeared from the eastern portion of its original range, persisting in the island of New Guinea as well as West Asia and Africa. With the rise of Mastiff breeds, the D lineage received a new life as it became common among many types of working dogs.

H7

Snoopy’s Haplotype

Part of the D haplogroup, this common haplotype has been found in French Bulldogs, Afghan Hounds, Bull Terriers, and village dogs spanning from South America to Africa and into the South Pacific.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The D paternal lineage is common in Boxers.