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“Queen Shi”
Shilo

Afghan Hound

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“Dasher”

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Registration

American Kennel Club (AKC):

Genetic Breed Result

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Afghan Hound

The Afghan Hound is a head-turning dog that is as old as they come. These dogs are a sight to behold when reaching top speed with all that hair blowing in the wind. They can make devoted companions with solid but gentle training

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Health Summary

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Good news!

Queen Shi is not at increased risk for the genetic health conditions that Embark tests.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Queen Shi’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

D4

Map

D

Shilo’s Haplogroup

D is a rare maternal line, which may be the result of an ancient dog breeding with another canid, possibly a wolf. It is found in Afghan Hounds and Scandinavian dog breeds.

D4

Shilo’s Haplotype

A member of the small D haplogroup, this rare haplotype occurs in Afghan Hounds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Afghan Hounds are one of few breeds that descends from this rare maternal line.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Queen Shi inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Queen Shi is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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