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Saddleback Coyote

Coyote (11.7% unresolved)

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This dog has been viewed and been given 1 wag

Genetic Breed Result

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Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Coyote

Coyotes aren’t really dogs. That’s the first thing people need to know about them. The second thing they need to know is that Coyotes do not make very good pets—they should be left to live in the wild as nature intended. However, just because people can’t bring them into their homes doesn’t mean that they aren’t fascinating creatures. There is a lot we can learn from these canid cousins of our beloved house pets.

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Start a conversation! Message this dog’s owner.

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Here’s what Saddleback Coyote’s family tree may have looked like.
Saddleback Coyote
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Coyote mix Coyote mix Coyote Coyote mix Coyote Coyote mix Coyote Coyote Coyote Coyote mix Coyote Coyote Coyote Coyote mix
While there may be other possible configurations of her family’s relationships, this is the most likely family tree to explain Saddleback Coyote’s breed mix.

Breed Reveal Video

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Health Summary

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Saddleback Coyote has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

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Saddleback Coyote inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Saddleback Coyote has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Saddleback Coyote has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Saddleback Coyote is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Saddleback Coyote’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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β-Mannosidosis (MANBA Exon 16, Mixed-Breed Variant)

Identified in Mixed-breed dogs

Xanthine Urolithiasis (XDH, Mixed Breed Variant)

Identified in Mixed-breed dogs

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Traits

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Saddleback Coyote’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

H

Haplotype

H5

Map

H

Saddleback Coyote’s Haplogroup

This is a lineage that is found infrequently in dogs and may only be found in coyotes and dogs with recent coyote ancestors. It is very different from all known dog lineages indicating a long time between the most recent common ancestor of canids in this lineage and domestic dogs.

H5

Saddleback Coyote’s Haplotype

This haplotype has been spotted in coyotes and dogs with coyote ancestry. Not only is that pretty neat, but it also helps move science forward.

North American coyotes have been known to mix with dogs in parts of the United States.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Saddleback Coyote inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Saddleback Coyote is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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