What is Embark?

Rowley

Chihuahua

No bio has been provided yet

This dog has been viewed 715 times

Genetic Breed Result

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Chihuahua

100.0% Chihuahua
Chihuahua Chihuahua
Chihuahuas have a huge personality that defies their tiny frame, known to be highly active and intelligent canines.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 0.3 % LOW Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 6 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 75 human years Learn More

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Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Through Rowley’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A232

Map

A1a

Rowley’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A232

Rowley’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs in village dogs in the South Pacific, as well as Bosnia and Herzegovina. Among breed dogs, this haplotype is most frequent in Labrador Retrievers, Yorkshire Terriers, and Maltese.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

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Paternal Haplotype

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Rowley is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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Maternal Haplotype