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“Retta”
Retta

Mixed Ancestry

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Genetic Breed Result

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Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Australian Shepherd

Australian Shepherds are an energetic mid-sized breed that make the perfect companion.

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Collie

Collies are attractive herding dogs, boasting a beautiful coat while being highly intelligent. They also make for extremely loyal and sweet family pets.

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DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Australian Shepherd
Collie
Unresolved

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Health Summary

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Retta inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM1

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Retta inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Research indicates that this genetic variant is not likely to increase the risk that Retta will develop this condition.

Scientific Basis

Dogs with Retta’s breeds have been included in research studies or have had follow-up by our experts that indicate that this genetic variant is not likely to increase the risk of Retta developing clinical disease.

Impact on Breeding

This genetic result should not be the primary factor in your breeding decisions.

What is Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM1?

DCM is the most common acquired heart disease of adult dogs. The heart has two heavily muscled ventricles that pump blood away from the heart. This disease causes progressive weakening of the ventricles by reducing the muscle mass, which causes the ventricles to dilate. Dilated ventricles do not contract and circulate oxygenated blood well, which eventually leads to heart failure.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Multiple Drug Sensitivity (ABCB1)

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Collies

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd (PRCD Exon 1)

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Collie Eye Anomaly (NHEJ1)

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Collies

Day Blindness (CNGB3 Deletion, Alaskan Malamute Variant)

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy, cmr1 (BEST1 Exon 2)

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Hereditary Cataracts (HSF4 Exon 9, Australian Shepherd Variant)

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones (SLC2A9)

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 6, NCL 6 (CLN6 Exon 7, Australian Shepherd Variant)

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 8, NCL 8 (CLN8, Australian Shepherd Variant)

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Recurrent Inflammatory Pulmonary Disease, RIPD (AKNA, Rough Collie Variant)

Identified in Collies

Craniomandibular Osteopathy, CMO (SLC37A2)

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Retta’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C2

Haplotype

C42/54/55

Map

C2

Retta’s Haplogroup

C2 is a very old female lineage found more commonly among English Setters, English Bulldogs, and American Eskimo Dogs. We also see C2 in village dogs in South Asia. Rather than having a few characteristic breeds representing this lineage particularly well, it is present in a few uncommon individuals of many different breeds. Unlike some European breed lineages that have seen skyrocketing popularity along the path to the modern dogs we see today, C2 tends to reflect the deep history of man's best friend.

C42/54/55

Retta’s Haplotype

Part of the C2 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

You can often find his haplogroup in the lovable English Bulldog.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Retta inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Retta is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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