Rally Howell

Rally Howell

Mixed Breed

“Rally was adopted at 8 weeks old from the Atlanta Humane Society on Howell Mill road (hence his middle name). He was brought to Atlanta from a shelter in Augusta, GA at 2 weeks old. He LOVES to play catch with his ball, chase/herd his jolly egg and is super energetic & athletic! He also LOVES walking on shoes, a trick he taught himself. NEVER a dull moment with this guy! He has my heart <3”

Instagram tag
@rally.howell

Place of Birth
Augusta, Georgia, USA
Current Location
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
From
Atlanta, GA, USA

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Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

50.0% Australian Shepherd
20.9% Treeing Walker Coonhound
15.8% Australian Cattle Dog
13.3% American English Coonhound
Australian Shepherd Australian Shepherd
Australian Shepherds are an energetic mid-sized breed that make the perfect companion.
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Treeing Walker Coonhound Treeing Walker Coonhound
The Treeing Walker Coonhound is phenomenal hunter and working dog. These hardy hounds were built with unmatched speed and stamina in their respective category. This American breed is mainly used today as a working/hunting dog, but can still make a wonderful companion.
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Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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American English Coonhound American English Coonhound
American English Coonhounds, perhaps more commonly known as Redtick Coonhounds, are an American breed of dog that originated in the Southern United States. As the descendants of hunting dogs brought over to the New World from Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries, American English Coonhounds are still valued today for their excellence as hunting dogs and loving dispositions.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.3 % LOW Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
33 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Rally Howell’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Australian Shepherd
Treeing Walker Coonhound
Australian Cattle Dog
American English Coonhound

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Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Rally Howell’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Rally Howell is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

And inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Primary Lens Luxation

Rally Howell inherited one copy of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Rally Howell has one copy of a variant in the ADAMTS17 gene and is at some risk for developing PLL. This variant is known to have an additive effect, so while dogs with one copy of the variant like Rally Howell have a higher risk than dogs with two healthy alleles at ADAMTS17, their risk is much lower than a dog with two copies of the variant. Actual risk associated with having one copy of this variant appears to vary in a breed-specific manner. A study published by Gould et al 2011 supports that Tibetan Terriers with one copy of the variant have minimal risk of developing PLL, whereas this risk can range from 2-20% in other terrier breeds. Please consult with your veterinarian to discuss the best ways to monitor Rally Howell's eyes and vision.

What is Primary Lens Luxation?

PLL occurs when the lens spontaneously detaches from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity. Anterior lens luxation is when the lens falls forward and posterior lens luxation is when the lens falls backwards in the eye.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Rally Howell inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd?

PRA-prcd is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of rod cells, leading to night blindness before day blindness.


ALT Activity

Rally Howell inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Rally Howell has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Rally Howell's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Rally Howell’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs and Australian Shepherds

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs and Australian Shepherds

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Hereditary Cataracts

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Cystinuria Type II-A

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 5

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 6, NCL 6

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs and Australian Shepherds

Late-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Craniomandibular Osteopathy, CMO

Identified in Australian Shepherds

Additional Genetic Conditions

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Red Pigment Intensity LINKAGE
I (Intensity) Loci
Any light fur likely yellow or tan
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Black/Brown and tan coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
Likely saddle tan patterned
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have some white areas in coat
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Likely to appear merle or "phantom merle"
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Larger
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Rally Howell’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B95

Map

B1

Rally Howell’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B95

Rally Howell’s Haplotype

Part of the B1 haplogroup, we see this haplotype most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

Through Rally Howell’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.46

Map

A1a

Rally Howell’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.46

Rally Howell’s Haplotype

Part of the A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.