Puck

Puck

Mixed Breed

“This mystery mutt was 2 or 3 when I found him! He was transferred from Texas to a Denver shelter and labeled a heeler mix, but the shelter volunteer suspected pointer instead. Other theories as to his makeup include coonhound, terrier, fairy dust, and silly putty. Puck (named after the fairy in Midsummer Night's Dream) has prey drive and wanderlust THROUGH THE ROOF. We love hiking, backpacking, and running half marathons together. He's a quiet boy at home (not a watch dog) and a snuggle muffin.”

Place of Birth
Pampa, TX, USA
Current Location
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
From
Humane Society Of The South Platte Valley, West Chenango Avenue, Littleton, CO, USA

This dog has been viewed 136 times and been given 15 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

26.4% Australian Cattle Dog
17.1% American Pit Bull Terrier
13.0% German Shepherd Dog
10.6% Great Pyrenees
8.1% Blue Lacy
6.1% Bloodhound
5.6% American Staffordshire Terrier
13.1% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
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German Shepherd Dog German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.
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Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees
The Great Pyrenees is an exceptionally loving dog whose primary function is to protect sheep, goats, livestock, people, children, grass, flowers, the moon, lawn furniture, and any real or imaginary predators that may intrude on your personal space. They have a strong build and an amazing thick white coat that exudes elegance and majesty. They make a great family dog because of their intelligence and steady temperament.
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Blue Lacy Blue Lacy
Developed in the mid 1850s, the Blue Lacy dog is a working dog bred for ranching in the unforgiving Texas heat. It has a lightly built but powerful body with a short, smooth coat.
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Bloodhound Bloodhound
There’s a reason the saying having a “nose like a Bloodhound” has become so pervasive -- Bloodhounds can track a scent without equal. These substantial hound dogs are easily recognizable due to their long, floppy ears and skin folds, which give them a somewhat comical or soulful expression. This breed is highly social and affectionate, and they will follow their nose wherever it takes them.
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American Staffordshire Terrier American Staffordshire Terrier
American Staffordshire Terriers are powerful but playful dogs that are both loyal and affectionate with their owners.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.0 % LOW Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
48 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Puck’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Australian Cattle Dog
American Pit Bull Terrier
German Shepherd Dog
Great Pyrenees
Blue Lacy
Bloodhound
American Staffordshire Terrier
Supermutt

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Puck
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Australian Cattle Dog mix American Pit Bull Terrier / Blue Lacy mix Bloodhound / American Staffordshire Terrier mix Australian Cattle Dog German Shepherd Dog / Great Pyrenees mix American Pit Bull Terrier Blue Lacy mix Bloodhound mix American Staffordshire Terrier mix Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog German Shepherd Dog Great Pyrenees

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Puck’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Puck is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

And inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Collie Eye Anomaly

Puck inherited both copies of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Puck has two copies of a mutated allele at the NHEJ1 gene and is at high risk for developing Collie Eye Anomaly. Please consult with your veterinarian to develop a diagnostic and monitoring plan for Puck.

What is Collie Eye Anomaly?

Named for its high prevalence in Collie dogs, Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) is more correctly termed choroidal hypoplasia. The choroid anchors the retina to the underlying structures and supplies it with oxygen and nourishment. CEA is a developmental disease of the choroid.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM2

Puck inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Our research indicates that this genetic variant is not likely to increase the risk that Puck will develop this disease.

Scientific Basis

Dogs with similar breeds to Puck are not likely to have increased risk of developing the disease. Research has indicated increased risk in other breeds that are not found in Puck.

What is Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM2?

DCM is the most common acquired heart disease of adult dogs. The heart has two heavily muscled ventricles that pump blood away from the heart. This disease causes progressive weakening of the ventricles by reducing the muscle mass, which causes the ventricles to dilate. Dilated ventricles do not contract and circulate oxygenated blood well, which eventually leads to heart failure.


ALT Activity

Puck inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Puck has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Puck has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Puck is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Puck’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs and German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III, CLADIII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Platelet factor X receptor deficiency, Scott Syndrome

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Day Blindness

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy

Identified in Great Pyrenees

Primary Lens Luxation

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Cystinuria Type II-A

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, and more

Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome, MPS VII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 5

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Late-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs and Great Pyrenees

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Additional Genetic Conditions

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Dark brown pigment
Cocoa
No impact on fur and skin color
Red Pigment Intensity LINKAGE
I (Intensity) Loci
Any light fur likely yellow or tan
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have large white areas in coat
Roan LINKAGE
R (Roan) Locus
Likely roan patterned
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Larger
Body Size 2
Intermediate
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Puck’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A234

Map

A1e

Puck’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A234

Puck’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, this haplotype occurs in village dogs in South America, South Asia, and into the South Pacific. Among breeds, we see it in highest frequency among Vizslas, Boxers, and Yorkshire Terriers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

Through Puck’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1

Haplotype

Ha.1

Map

A1

Puck’s Haplogroup

A1 is the male lineage in several breeds that aren't very closely related to each other. Gordon Setters, Newfoundlands, and Miniature Schnauzers all had male founders from this paternal line, and now many males in those breeds carry their Y chromosome. Each of these breeds started in the past 200-300 years, and their founders must have included dogs that trace back to the same male ancestors deeper in dog evolutionary time, stretching all the way back to when dogs were first domesticated in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Unlike many Y chromosome (male) lineages found in European and recent American breeds, only one village dog (in Alaska) carries an A1 Y chromosome, indicating that the breeds from this lineage probably didn't travel around the world with European colonization as much as some other breeds.

Ha.1

Puck’s Haplotype

The lone member of the A1 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs in Newfoundlands, Miniature Schnauzers, Gordon Setters, and village dogs in Alaska.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The Newfoundland is from the A1 paternal line.