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Piper

Cocker Spaniel

“Piper is vivacious, spunky, easily startled and very friendly towards other dogs. She surprisingly isn't spoiled despite all our efforts. She loves bacon flavored treats, playing fetch with literally anything, going to daycare and playing with her friends, and walks with Mom and Dad. She has made ours lives so much richer and we couldn't be more greatful.”

Location
Evansville, Indiana, USA

This dog has been viewed 209 times and been given 15 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Cocker Spaniel

100.0% Cocker Spaniel
Cocker Spaniel Cocker Spaniel
Cocker Spaniels are handsome and intelligent hunting dogs that are also well-suited to life as a loving family pet.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness:

2.0 % HIGH

Predicted Adult Weight:

32 lbs

Genetic Age:

21 human years

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Piper’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Through Piper’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C2

Haplotype

C3/14

Map

C2

Piper’s Haplogroup

C2 is a very old female lineage found more commonly among English Setters, English Bulldogs, and American Eskimo Dogs. We also see C2 in village dogs in South Asia. Rather than having a few characteristic breeds representing this lineage particularly well, it is present in a few uncommon individuals of many different breeds. Unlike some European breed lineages that have seen skyrocketing popularity along the path to the modern dogs we see today, C2 tends to reflect the deep history of man's best friend.

C3/14

Piper’s Haplotype

Part of the C2 haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs most often in English Setters, Cairn Terriers, Labrador Retrievers, and village dogs in Peru, Fiji, and across Africa.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

You can often find his haplogroup in the lovable English Bulldog.

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Piper is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.