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“Pella”
Black Pearl Pella von der Nidderspitz IPO1 OB3 AG3

Belgian Shepherd

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“IPO1, OB3, Ag3 HD-A, ED-0/0, Back OK, Eyes: distichiasis”

Place of Birth

Germany

Current Location

Swifterbant, Flevoland, Nederland

From

Germany

This dog has been viewed and been given 1 wag

Registration

N/A : 2926641

Genetic Breed Result

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Belgian Sheepdog

The Belgian Sheepdog is one of the four varieties of Belgian Shepherd, though the AKC distinguishes them as their own breed. This active working dog is renowned for its intelligence and drive. If given the opportunity for plenty of physical and mental exercise, the Belgian Sheepdog will astound you with its athleticism and versatility.

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Belgian Malinois

The Belgian Malinois is an impressive working dog. These guys have become a staple within the military and the police force due to their intelligence and drive. They can make wonderful companions as long as they are thoroughly exercised.

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Genetic Stats

Predicted Adult Weight

40 lbs

Genetic Age
69 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Belgian Sheepdog
Belgian Malinois

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Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 12/8/2018 changed name from "Pella" to "Black Pearl Pella von der Nidderspitz"
  • On 12/8/2018 changed name from "Black Pearl Pella von der Nidderspitz" to "Pella"
  • On 12/8/2018 changed name from "Pella" to "Black Pearl Pella von der Nidderspitz"

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Health Summary

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Good news!

Pella is not at increased risk for the genetic health conditions that Embark tests.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome, MPS VII (GUSB Exon 3, German Shepherd Variant)

Identified in Belgian Malinois, Belgian Sheepdogs, and more

Spongy Degeneration with Cerebellar Ataxia 1 (KCNJ10)

Identified in Belgian Malinois, Belgian Sheepdogs, and more

Spongy Degeneration with Cerebellar Ataxia 2 (ATP1B2)

Identified in Belgian Malinois, Belgian Sheepdogs, and more

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

E Locus (MC1R)
Can have a melanistic mask (EmEm)
K Locus (CBD103)
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown coat (KBky)
Intensity Loci LINKAGE
No impact on coat pattern (Intermediate Red Pigmentation)
A Locus (ASIP)
Not expressed (ayay)
D Locus (MLPH)
Dark areas of hair and skin are not lightened (DD)
B Locus (TYRP1)
Black or gray hair and skin (BB)
Saddle Tan (RALY)
Not expressed (NN)
S Locus (MITF)
Likely solid colored, but may have small amounts of white (Ssp)
M Locus (PMEL)
No merle alleles (mm)
H Locus (Harlequin)
No harlequin alleles (hh)
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings (RSPO2) LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows) (II)
Coat Length (FGF5)
Likely long coat (TT)
Shedding (MC5R)
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding (CC)
Hairlessness (FOXI3) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Hairlessness (SGK3)
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (SLC45A2) LINKAGE
Likely not albino (NN)
Coat Texture (KRT71)
Likely straight coat (CC)
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length (BMP3)
Likely medium or long muzzle (CC)
Tail Length (T)
Likely normal-length tail (CC)
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
Unlikely to have hind dew claws (CC)
Blue Eye Color (ALX4) LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes (NN)
Back Muscling & Bulk, Large Breed (ACSL4)
Likely normal muscling (CC)
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size (IGF1)
Larger (NN)
Body Size (IGFR1)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (STC2)
Intermediate (TA)
Body Size (GHR - E191K)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (GHR - P177L)
Larger (CC)
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
Normal altitude tolerance (GG)
Appetite (POMC) LINKAGE
Normal food motivation (NN)
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Through Pella’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B6/8/67

Map

B1

Black Pearl Pella von der Nidderspitz’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B6/8/67

Black Pearl Pella von der Nidderspitz’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs in village dogs from South America to the Middle East, all the way down to the French Polynesian Islands. Among the 12 breed dogs we have seen it in, it occurs most frequently among German Shepherd Dogs, English Springer Spaniels, and Havanese.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Pella inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Pella is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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