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“Selene”
Selene Gazi Baba Volcanoes

Sarplaninac

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“Imported from Macedonia, out of a show line dam and mountain line sire. Selene works in our livestock guardian dog pack in Western Montana against wolf, bear, and cougar. She lives with Kunekune pigs, dairy goats, poultry and horses.”

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@PracticalFarmgirl

This dog has been viewed and been given 7 wags

Registration

FCI/ UKC: P859-780

Genetic Breed Result

Selene Gazi Baba Volcanoes

“Selene”
Selene Gazi Baba Volcanoes

Sarplaninac
100.0% Sarplaninac

Sarplaninac

Large and imposing, the Sarplaninac is still often used for its original purpose of being a livestock guardian. This landrace breed has a rich history and is considered to be an ancient type of dog.

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Genetic Stats

Predicted Adult Weight

62 lbs

Genetic Age
52 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

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Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 6/30/2018 changed handle from "selenegazibabavolcanoes" to "nwgselene"

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Selene’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Selene has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

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Selene inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Selene has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Selene has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Selene is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Selene’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Additional Genetic Conditions

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

E Locus (MC1R)
No dark mask or grizzle (EE)
K Locus (CBD103)
More likely to have a patterned haircoat (kyky)
Intensity Loci LINKAGE
Any light hair likely white or cream (Dilute Red Pigmentation)
A Locus (ASIP)
Fawn Sable coat color pattern (ayaw)
D Locus (MLPH)
Dark areas of hair and skin are not lightened (DD)
B Locus (TYRP1)
Black or gray hair and skin (BB)
S Locus (MITF)
Likely to have little to no white in coat (SS)
H Locus (Harlequin)
hh
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings (RSPO2) LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows) (II)
Coat Length (FGF5)
Likely long coat (TT)
Shedding (MC5R)
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding (CC)
Hairlessness (FOXI3) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (SLC45A2) LINKAGE
Likely not albino (NN)
Coat Texture (KRT71)
Likely straight coat (CC)
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length (BMP3)
Likely medium or long muzzle (CC)
Tail Length (T)
Likely normal-length tail (CC)
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
Unlikely to have hind dew claws (CC)
Blue Eye Color (ALX4) LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes (NN)
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size (IGF1)
Larger (NN)
Body Size (IGFR1)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (STC2)
Larger (TT)
Body Size (GHR - E191K)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (GHR - P177L)
Larger (CC)
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
Normal altitude tolerance (GG)
Appetite (POMC) LINKAGE
Normal food motivation (NN)
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Through Selene’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A16/17/99/100

Map

A1a

Selene Gazi Baba Volcanoes’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A16/17/99/100

Selene Gazi Baba Volcanoes’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this common haplotype is found in village dogs across the globe. Among breed dogs, we find it most frequently in Labrador Retrievers, Newfoundlands, German Shepherd Dogs, and Golden Retrievers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Selene inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Selene is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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