Venn diagram

Compare your dogs to Nuke - HP58054002 Select one to begin:

“Nuke - HP58054002”
GCHB Dykumos DEFCON 1 Burning Up The Sky CGCU TKN CGCA SC BCAT RI

Rhodesian Ridgeback

  • Nuke - HP58054002, a Rhodesian Ridgeback tested with EmbarkVet.com Nuke - HP58054002, a Rhodesian Ridgeback tested with EmbarkVet.com
    Nuke and his 2019 National loot - he was 4th Place 6-9 Puppy sweeps, 2nd Place 6-9 Puppy, earned his CGC and his CGCU, and earned his third Rally Novice Q and new title! LOVE this boy.

“Nuke is a moderate sized dog with healthy bone & substance. He stands within our standard's suggested height at 26 3/4'. He has a powerful natural gait, & self moves with confidence and ease. He has a wonderful temperament, & great drive - he is an absolute joy to work with. Nuke has excelled in the ring, on the field, & in the whelping box. Nuke is a proven sire, with 3 litters on the ground & multiple champion get. All puppies have been ridged to date, no dermoids. OFA CHIC #158608”

Place of Birth

Naples, FL, USA

Current Location

Bangor, Pennsylvania, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 3 wags

Registration

American Kennel Club (AKC): HP 58054002

Genetic Breed Result

Loading...

Rhodesian Ridgeback

Rhodesian Ridgebacks, instantly recognizable by their ridge of hair along their back, are hunting dogs that have adapted over time to become loyal and protective family companions.

Learn More

Loading...

Start a conversation! Message this dog’s owner.

Loading...

Explore

Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 10/22/2019 changed name from "Nuke - Dykumos DEFCON 1 Burning Up The Sky" to "Dykumos DEFCON 1 Burning Up The Sky"
Here’s what Nuke - HP58054002’s family tree may have looked like.
While there may be other possible configurations of his family’s relationships, this is the most likely family tree to explain Nuke - HP58054002’s breed mix.

Breed Reveal Video

Loading...

Explore

Health Summary

warn icon

Nuke - HP58054002 inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

And one variant that you should tell your vet about.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM1

warn icon

Nuke - HP58054002 inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Research indicates that this genetic variant is not likely to increase the risk that Nuke - HP58054002 will develop this condition.

Scientific Basis

Dogs with Nuke - HP58054002’s breed have been included in research studies or have had follow-up by our experts that indicate that this genetic variant is not likely to increase the risk of Nuke - HP58054002 developing clinical disease.

Impact on Breeding

This genetic result should not be the primary factor in your breeding decisions.

What is Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM1?

DCM is the most common acquired heart disease of adult dogs. The heart has two heavily muscled ventricles that pump blood away from the heart. This disease causes progressive weakening of the ventricles by reducing the muscle mass, which causes the ventricles to dilate. Dilated ventricles do not contract and circulate oxygenated blood well, which eventually leads to heart failure.

ALT Activity

warn icon

Nuke - HP58054002 inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Nuke - HP58054002 has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Nuke - HP58054002 has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Nuke - HP58054002 is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Nuke - HP58054002’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

good icon

Hemophilia B (F9 Exon 7, Rhodesian Ridgeback Variant)

Identified in Rhodesian Ridgebacks

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM (SOD1A)

Identified in Rhodesian Ridgebacks

Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (DIRAS1)

Identified in Rhodesian Ridgebacks

Exercise-Induced Collapse, EIC (DNM1)

Identified in Rhodesian Ridgebacks

Additional Genetic Conditions

good icon

Explore

Traits

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

Loading...

Explore

Through Nuke - HP58054002’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A25

Map

A1e

Dykumos DEFCON 1 Burning Up The Sky’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A25

Dykumos DEFCON 1 Burning Up The Sky’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we have detected this haplotype in village dogs in Mexico. We also see it in Irish Wolfhounds, Great Pyrenees, Brittanys, and Labrador Retrievers.

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

Loading...

Explore

Through Nuke - HP58054002’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.19

Map

A1a

Dykumos DEFCON 1 Burning Up The Sky’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.19

Dykumos DEFCON 1 Burning Up The Sky’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs in village dogs throughout central Africa. We also see it in English Setters, where it is the most common haplotype for that breed.

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

Loading...

Explore