Embark logo

Nala Babe

Mixed Breed

  • On her 3rd Birthday.

“Nala was born at a rescue to a litter of eight. A very loving girl who loves to give kisses and jumps up on anything and everything. Unfortunately that also means all four feet on the counter, stove, car hood, you name it. Even sat her butt on a spinning roller stool.”

Place of Birth
Evansville, IN, USA
Current Location
Bartlesville, Oklahoma, USA
From
Evansville, IN, USA

This dog has been viewed 578 times and been given 0 wags

Registration

Microchip: 900164000531481

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

25.7% American Pit Bull Terrier
19.7% Siberian Husky
18.6% Australian Cattle Dog
15.7% American Bulldog
11.7% Australian Shepherd
8.6% American Staffordshire Terrier
American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
Learn More
Siberian Husky Siberian Husky
Bred initially in Northern Siberia, the Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog who is quick and light on their feet. Their moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest their Northern heritage. Huskies are very active and energetic and are known for being long distance sled dogs.
Learn More
Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
Learn More
American Bulldog American Bulldog
American bulldogs are enjoying a healthy increase in popularity, either as a working/protector dog or as a family pet. All over the world, they are used variously as "hog dogs" (catching escaped pigs or hunting razorbacks), as cattle drovers and as working or sport K-9s. American Bulldogs also successfully compete in several dog sports such as dog obedience, Iron Dog competition and weight pulling.
Learn More
Australian Shepherd Australian Shepherd
Australian Shepherds are an energetic mid-sized breed that make the perfect companion.
Learn More
American Staffordshire Terrier American Staffordshire Terrier
American Staffordshire Terriers are powerful but playful dogs that are both loyal and affectionate with their owners.
Learn More
Start a conversation! Message this dog’s humans.

Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.4 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
49 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Nala Babe’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
American Pit Bull Terrier
Siberian Husky
Australian Cattle Dog
American Bulldog
Australian Shepherd
American Staffordshire Terrier
Changes to this dog’s profile
Learn More
  • On 5/3/2018 changed name from "Nala" to "Nala Babe"

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS American Pit Bull Terrier mix Mixed American Pit Bull Terrier American Bulldog / American Staffordshire Terrier mix Siberian Husky mix Australian Cattle Dog / Australian Shepherd mix American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier American Bulldog American Staffordshire Terrier mix Siberian Husky Siberian Husky mix Australian Cattle Dog Australian Shepherd

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Nala Babe’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
168
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Normal
Nala Babe has two normal alleles at ALT.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Nala Babe did not test positive for any of the genetic conditions that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Nala Babe’s diagnosis and treatment if she gets sick in the future.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Nala Babe is not a carrier for any of the genetic conditions that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Nala Babe tested clear for 19 genetic conditions that are common in her breed mix.
Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Nala Babe.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, Australian Shepherds, but not Nala Babe.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1
(PDE6B)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, but not Nala Babe.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2
(IQCB1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, but not Nala Babe.

Collie Eye Anomaly, Choroidal Hypoplasia, CEA
(NHEJ1)
Eyes

Named for its high prevalence in Collie dogs, Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) is more correctly termed choroidal hypoplasia and is a developmental disease of the choroid. The ch…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Nala Babe.

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy
cmr1 (BEST1 Exon 2)
Eyes

This is a non-progressive retinal disease that, in rare cases, can lead to vision loss. CMR is typically only identified when a vet examines the eye which, in dogs with C…

Seen in American Bulldogs, Australian Shepherds, but not Nala Babe.

Hereditary Cataracts, Early-Onset Cataracts, Juvenile Cataracts
(HSF4 Exon 9 Shepherd Variant)
Eyes

One of the leading causes of blindness in dogs (and humans!), cataracts are a progressive disease of the lens that causes functional blindness, but can be surgically corr…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Nala Babe.

Primary Lens Luxation
(ADAMTS17)
Eyes

This surgically correctable condition causes the lens to spontaneously detach from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity and irritation …

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Nala Babe.

Cystinuria Type II-A
(SLC3A1)
Kidney and Bladder

A disease of cystine accumulation, affected dogs are prone to developing cystine kidney and bladder stones, which if caught early can be managed with dietary changes, inc…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Nala Babe.

Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis, HUU
(SLC2A9)
Kidney and Bladder

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate; if caught early, it is responsive to dietary management. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabol…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, American Bulldogs, Australian Shepherds, American Staffordshire Terriers, but not Nala Babe.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL-A
(ARSG Exon 2)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, but not Nala Babe.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 1
(CLN5 Border Collie Variant)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Nala Babe.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 6, NCL 6
(CLN6 Exon 7)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Nala Babe.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(CLN8 Australian Shepherd Variant)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, Australian Shepherds, but not Nala Babe.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 10, NCL 10
(CTSD Exon 5)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in American Bulldogs, but not Nala Babe.

GM1 Gangliosidosis
(GLB1 Exon 15 Alaskan Husky Variant)
Multisystem

An early onset form of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause affected dogs to display neurologic signs as puppies or young adults. These include partial or total visi…

Seen in Siberian Huskys, but not Nala Babe.

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, American Staffordshire Terriers, but not Nala Babe.

Myotonia Congenita
(CLCN1 Exon 23)
Muscular

This condition is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction and stiffness that usually resolves with normal exercise, though physical therapy can be beneficial. The g…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Nala Babe.

Craniomandibular Osteopathy, CMO
(SLC37A2)
Skeletal

A noncancerous, proliferative bone disease that commonly affects the lower jaw and tympanic bullae, CMO is best known in the West Highland White Terrier, Scottish Terrier…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Nala Babe.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 149

Nala Babe is clear of 149 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
No Call
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Likely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Nala Babe’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B1b

Map

B1

Nala Babe’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B1b

Nala Babe’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs across the world, including those from Central America, the Middle East, South Asia, and the French Polynesian Islands. Among the 31 breed dogs we see it in, we see it in Poodles, Otterhounds, and Labrador Retrievers. It is also our most commonly-sampled Golden Retriever haplotype!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Nala Babe inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Nala Babe is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.