What is Embark?

Moose

Mixed Breed

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Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

30.2% Australian Shepherd
25.4% Labrador Retriever
16.8% Golden Retriever
10.2% Irish Setter
8.4% Australian Cattle Dog
9.0% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Australian Shepherd Australian Shepherd
Australian Shepherds are an energetic mid-sized breed that make the perfect companion.
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Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever
The Labrador Retriever was bred for hunting and excelled in retrieving game after it was shot down. Known for its gentle disposition and loyalty, the Labrador Retriever has become a favorite of families and breeders alike.
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Golden Retriever Golden Retriever
Developed as an ideal hunting retriever, the Golden Retriever's eagerness to please and friendliness has made them an extremely popular family pet.
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Irish Setter Irish Setter
The Irish Setter is a stunning breed that traces its origins all the way back to 18th century Ireland. They were orignally bred for hunting, but now they serve as loyal companions. This is an energetic and sensistive dog that is sure to impress everyone it meets.
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Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 1.1 % MEDIUM Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 53 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 26 human years Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Moose’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Australian Shepherd
Labrador Retriever
Golden Retriever
Irish Setter
Australian Cattle Dog
Supermutt

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Family tree

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Mixed Australian Shepherd mix Labrador Retriever mix Australian Shepherd mix Labrador Retriever mix Australian Shepherd Mixed Labrador Retriever Mixed Australian Shepherd Mixed Labrador Retriever Mixed
Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Moose’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Coat Color

A number of genes are known to affect coat color in dogs, and they all interact. In some cases, other genetic effects may also influence color and pattern.

Trait
Result
 
E Locus (Mask, Grizzle, Recessive Red)
EE or Ee or ee
K Locus (Dominant Black)
KBKB
A Locus (Agouti, Sable)
aa or ata or atat
D Locus (Dilute, Blue, Fawn)
DD
B Locus (Brown, Chocolate, Liver, Red)
BB

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Color genes:

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings, shedding and curls are all genetic! And they all interact, too. In fact, the combination of these genes explains the coat phenotypes of 90% of AKC registered dog breeds.

Trait
Result
 
Long Haircoat (FGF5)
GT
Shedding (MC5R)
CT
Curly Coat (KRT71)
CT

More information on coat type genetics: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2897713/figure/F3/

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Traits genes:

Other Body Features

Trait
Result
 
Brachycephaly (BMP3)
CC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
CC
Blue Eye Color
LINKAGE
N/N

Body Size

Body size is a complex trait that is affected by both genetic and environmental variation. Our genetic analysis includes genes that, together, explain over 80% of the variation in dog body size. It does not account for runting or stunting; nor does it account for the interactions between various genes both known and unknown.

Trait
Result
 
Body Size - IGF1
NN
Body Size - IGF1R
GG
Body Size - STC2
TT
Body Size - GHR (E195K)
GG
Body Size - GHR (P177L)
CC

Other Embark dogs with these Body Size genes:

Performance

Trait
Result
 
Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
GG

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Family tree

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Moose’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A2a

Map

A1e

Moose’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A2a

Moose’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs up and down the Americas as well as French Polynesia. Among the breed dogs we have detected it in, we see it most frequently in English Springer Spaniels, Papillons, and Collies.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

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Family tree

Traits

Paternal Haplotype

Through Moose’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2b

Haplotype

Hc.10

Map

A2b

Moose’s Haplogroup

A2b appears to have split a few times in succession, which means that some of the Central Asian male ancestors of this lineage went their separate ways before their respective Y chromosomes made their rounds. There is not much diversity in this lineage, meaning that it has only begun to take off recently. Two iconic breeds, the Dachshund and Bloodhound, represent this lineage well. Over half of Rottweilers are A2b, as are the majority of Labrador Retrievers and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. While A2a is restricted mostly to East Asia, this paternal line is also found among European breeds.

Hc.10

Moose’s Haplotype

Part of the A2b haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Labrador Retrievers, Rottweilers, Curly-Coated Retrievers, Dandie Dinmont Terriers, and village dogs throughout the world.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A2b is found in the Daschund breed.

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Family tree

Traits

Maternal Haplotype