Mo

Mo

Mixed Breed

“Mo just had foreign body surgery at 15 years of age! He is sneaky and clever and loves food, hiding things, and attention!”

Current Location
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
From
Arizona Humane Society Sunnyslope Campus, West Hatcher Road, Phoenix, AZ, USA

This dog has been viewed 141 times and been given 0 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

16.6% Chihuahua
15.5% American Pit Bull Terrier
12.1% Chow Chow
11.1% Poodle (Small)
7.2% Shih Tzu
6.8% Lhasa Apso
6.3% Papillon
24.4% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Chihuahua Chihuahua
Chihuahuas have a huge personality that defies their tiny frame, known to be highly active and intelligent canines.
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American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
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Chow Chow Chow Chow
This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. Often aloof and suspicious of strangers, the Chow Chow may not be a cuddle buddy, but for the right person, they are a fiercely loyal companion.
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Poodle (Small) Poodle (Small)
A highly intelligent and playful dog, Miniature and Toy Poodles make for great lap dogs and companions.
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Shih Tzu Shih Tzu
This ancient breed is the perfect lapdog. Sweet and easygoing, they want nothing more than to be close to their humans.
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Lhasa Apso Lhasa Apso
An independent breed, the Lhasa's goal in life is not necessarily to please their master. The Lhasa Apso is a small, hardy breed with a beautiful cloak of hair that parts down the back from head to tail. Their temperament is unique: joyful and mischievous, dignified and aloof. Popular in the show ring, the breed also excels at activities that provide constant challenges, such as agility.
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Papillon Papillon
The Papillon, also called the Continental Toy Spaniel, is a breed of dog of the Spaniel type.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Mo’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Chihuahua
American Pit Bull Terrier
Chow Chow
Poodle (Small)
Shih Tzu
Lhasa Apso
Papillon
Supermutt

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Mo
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Mixed Chihuahua / Poodle (Small) mix Shih Tzu / Lhasa Apso mix American Pit Bull Terrier / Chow Chow mix Mixed Chihuahua Poodle (Small) Shih Tzu mix Lhasa Apso mix American Pit Bull Terrier Chow Chow Mixed Mixed

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Mo’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Through Mo’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A276

Map

A1e

Mo’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A276

Mo’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, this haplotype has been spotted in village dogs in French Polynesia. Among breeds, it occurs in both small (French Bulldog, Miniature Schnauzers, Dachshunds) and large (Great Danes, Bullmastiffs) breeds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

Through Mo’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

H10.1/Hd.4

Map

D

Mo’s Haplogroup

The D paternal lineage is very common in well-known populations of dogs. Breeds belonging to the D lineage likely have direct male ancestors that can be traced all the way back to the origin of domestic dogs themselves! One popular breed that commonly sports a D lineage is the Boxer. Boxers were developed in the late 19th century from Mastiff dogs, so it is no surprise that D is well represented among Mastiffs, Bulldogs, as well as Terriers. Intriguingly, D is also found among Lhasa Apsos, an ancient Tibetan breed, and Afghan Hounds. While the presence of this lineage in Polynesia or the New World can be chalked up to interbreeding with European dogs brought during voyages of discovery or later settlement, D is also well represented among village dog populations in the Middle East and Africa. If the fact that we find dogs bearing a D lineage in the Middle East (not to mention the large amount of diversity among Middle Eastern D lineage males) is any indication of ancient residence in that region, then the presence among Oceanian village dogs is peculiar. Rather, it may be that D is part of a broader Eurasian group of ancient paternal lineages which disappeared from the eastern portion of its original range, persisting in the island of New Guinea as well as West Asia and Africa. With the rise of Mastiff breeds, the D lineage received a new life as it became common among many types of working dogs.

H10.1/Hd.4

Mo’s Haplotype

Part of the D haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The D paternal lineage is common in Boxers.