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Minnie

Mixed Ancestry

“Minnie had her puppies in a Romanian shelter when she was a six month old puppy herself. She was never seperated from her daughter Layla and they came to Germany together, when she was four years old. We fell in love and adopted both. Minnie is always the boss in any dog group, no matter the sizes. She is fearless and a great companion dog. Minnie likes to guard the house and hates noises, especially church bells.”

Instagram tag
@elliisstrange

Place of Birth

Timișoara, Romania

Current Location

A, Bavaria, Germany

From

Timișoara, Romania

This dog has been viewed and been given 38 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Pekingese

Pekingese were dogs bred for centuries to be the prized companions of the imperial family of China. Today they are still cherished family companions and show dogs who greet everyone they meet with dignity and grace.

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Russell-type Terrier

These small, energetic terriers, developed in 19th century England for hunting small game, are now some of the best agility dogs around.

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Prague Ratter

The Prague Ratter is a lively little dog with a friendly disposition. They are intelligent and are eager to learn and please their owners.

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Dogs Like Minnie

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Minnie. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Pekingese
Russell-type Terrier
Prague Ratter
Supermutt

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Here’s what Minnie’s family tree may have looked like.
While there may be other possible configurations of her family’s relationships, this is the most likely family tree to explain Minnie’s breed mix.

Breed Reveal Video

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Through Minnie’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A425

Map

A1d

Minnie’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A425

Minnie’s Haplotype

Part of the A1d haplogroup, the A425 haplotype occurs most commonly in Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs. It's a rare find!

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Minnie inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Minnie is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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