Mimzy

Mixed Breed

“Mimzy was adopted from the Humane society. She is very shy with new people at first but loyal once she gets to know you. She is very protective of the person she loves most and likes to follow them. Mimzy is very playful and energetic. She likes to herd people around. She likes to play with her fruit and veggies before she eats it. She is an extremely fast learner. She can learn a new trick in one night. She likes to dance with us. She's a quirky one.”

Place of Birth
Georgia, USA
Current Location
Saukville, Wisconsin, USA
From
Saukville, WI, USA

This dog has been viewed 638 times and been given 4 wags

Registration

Microchip: 982126053292488

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

34.0% Australian Cattle Dog
11.2% Chow Chow
10.9% American Pit Bull Terrier
9.9% Labrador Retriever
9.6% Boston Terrier
8.4% Great Pyrenees
8.0% Mountain Cur
8.0% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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Chow Chow Chow Chow
This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. Often aloof and suspicious of strangers, the Chow Chow may not be a cuddle buddy, but for the right person, they are a fiercely loyal companion.
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American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
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Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever
The Labrador Retriever was bred for hunting and excelled in retrieving game after it was shot down. Known for its gentle disposition and loyalty, the Labrador Retriever has become a favorite of families and breeders alike.
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Boston Terrier Boston Terrier
Boston Terriers are lively, intelligent and friendly. Although a small dog, they are strong and sturdy. Owners of this breed find them to be As the breed's name implies, the Boston Terrier originated in the city of Boston in the late 19th century. They're sometimes referred to be their nickname of the "American gentleman" because of their tuxedo-like coat.
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Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees
The Great Pyrenees is an exceptionally loving dog whose primary function is to protect sheep, goats, livestock, people, children, grass, flowers, the moon, lawn furniture, and any real or imaginary predators that may intrude on your personal space. They have a strong build and an amazing thick white coat that exudes elegance and majesty. They make a great family dog because of their intelligence and steady temperament.
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Mountain Cur Mountain Cur
Mountain Curs are an American breed of treeing hound. Developed in the South—particularly Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee—Mountain Curs are an all-American breed that has been prized for years as excellent hunting companions and loyal pets.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

2.8 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
28 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Mimzy’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Australian Cattle Dog
Chow Chow
American Pit Bull Terrier
Labrador Retriever
Boston Terrier
Great Pyrenees
Mountain Cur
Supermutt

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Australian Cattle Dog mix Chow Chow / Labrador Retriever mix American Pit Bull Terrier / Boston Terrier mix Australian Cattle Dog Mountain Cur / Australian Cattle Dog mix Chow Chow Labrador Retriever mix American Pit Bull Terrier Boston Terrier mix Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog Mountain Cur mix Australian Cattle Dog mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Mimzy’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Good news!

Mimzy is not at increased risk for the genetic health conditions that Embark tests.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Canine Elliptocytosis

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs and Labrador Retrievers

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2, GR-PRA2

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Day Blindness

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy

Identified in Great Pyrenees

Primary Lens Luxation

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Macular Corneal Dystrophy, MCD

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Cystinuria Type II-A

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers and Labrador Retrievers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 5

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Alexander Disease

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in Great Pyrenees

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Narcolepsy

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

Identified in Boston Terriers

Centronuclear Myopathy

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Exercise-Induced Collapse

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Hereditary Nasal Parakeratosis

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Skeletal Dysplasia 2, SD2

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Additional Genetic Conditions


Clinical Tools

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have large white areas in coat
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Likely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Mimzy’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A382

Map

A1a

Mimzy’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A382

Mimzy’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and Chesapeake Bay Retrievers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Mimzy inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Mimzy is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.