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“Meg”
Megabucks 4 Bimini Du Chateau Rocher

Beauceron

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“Loves to be with the sheep and goats. Rounds them up. Puts them in different pastures when needed. Great friend and companion. Always by my side.”

Place of Birth

Woodlake, CA, USA

Current Location

Gilbert, AZ, USA

From

Woodlake, CA, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 4 wags

Registration

American Kennel Club (AKC): DN45602305
Microchip: 985112006141081

Genetic Breed Result

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Beauceron

The Beauceron is a large purebred known for being courageous, friendly, intelligent, loyal, and protective. The most common colors for Beaucerons are black, black and tan, and gray. To keep it healthy, it will need to get exercise regularly. Known to be multi-talented, the Beauceron participates in a wide variety of activities such as agility, competitive obedience, guarding, herding, military work, police work, schutzhund, and tracking.

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Health Summary

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Good news!

Meg is not at increased risk for the genetic health conditions that Embark tests.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Meg’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A361/409/611

Map

A1b

Megabucks 4 Bimini Du Chateau Rocher’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A361/409/611

Megabucks 4 Bimini Du Chateau Rocher’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in German Shepherd Dogs, Poodles, and Shiloh Shepherds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Meg inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Meg is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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