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Maya

Mixed Breed

“Maya was found being a stray near the boarder of Mexico in San Diego. When we adapted her, her weight was 19lb,,, very skinny. She is happy and healthy 30lb now! She loves chasing/hunting & Swimming. She also loves kids!”

Current Location
Coatesville, Pennsylvania, USA
From
San Diego County Department of Animal Services, Sweetwater Road, Bonita, CA, USA

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Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

31.9% Cocker Spaniel
16.3% American Pit Bull Terrier
14.6% Lhasa Apso
12.1% Dachshund
11.8% Akita
13.3% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Cocker Spaniel Cocker Spaniel
Cocker Spaniels are handsome and intelligent hunting dogs that are also well-suited to life as a loving family pet.
Learn More
American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
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Lhasa Apso Lhasa Apso
An independent breed, the Lhasa's goal in life is not necessarily to please their master. The Lhasa Apso is a small, hardy breed with a beautiful cloak of hair that parts down the back from head to tail. Their temperament is unique: joyful and mischievous, dignified and aloof. Popular in the show ring, the breed also excels at activities that provide constant challenges, such as agility.
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Dachshund Dachshund
The Dachshund, meaning “badger dog” in German, is a lively breed with a friendly personality and a great sense of smell. Known for their long and low bodies, they are spirited hunters that excel in both above and below-ground work. They come in three different coat varieties (smooth, wirehaired or longhaired) and can be miniature or standard size.
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Akita Akita
The Akita is a large breed of dog originating from the mountainous northern regions of Japan.
Learn More
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.8 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
89 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Maya’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Cocker Spaniel
American Pit Bull Terrier
Lhasa Apso
Dachshund
Akita
Supermutt

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Cocker Spaniel mix American Pit Bull Terrier mix Lhasa Apso / Akita mix Cocker Spaniel Dachshund / Cocker Spaniel mix American Pit Bull Terrier Mixed Lhasa Apso Akita Cocker Spaniel Cocker Spaniel Dachshund Cocker Spaniel mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Maya’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Good news!

Maya is not at increased risk for the genetic health conditions that Embark tests.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 1, GR-PRA1

Identified in Lhasa Apsos

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1

Identified in Dachshunds

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Autosomal Recessive Hereditary Nephropathy, Familial Nephropathy, ARHN

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA, Sanfilippo Syndrome Type A, MPS IIIA

Identified in Dachshunds

Glycogen storage disease Type VII, Phosphofructokinase Deficiency, PFK Deficiency

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 1

Identified in Dachshunds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 2, NCL 2

Identified in Dachshunds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Acral Mutilation Syndrome

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Exercise-Induced Collapse

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Oculocutaneous Albinism, OCA2

Identified in Lhasa Apsos

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Dachshunds

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Identified in Cocker Spaniels and Dachshunds

Additional Genetic Conditions


Clinical Tools

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Maya’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C1

Haplotype

C7/10

Map

C1

Maya’s Haplogroup

Congratulations, C1 is a very exotic female lineage! It is more closely associated with maternal lineages found in wolves, foxes and jackals than with other dog lineages. So it seems dogs in this group have a common male dog ancestor who, many thousands of years ago, mated with a female wolf! This is not a common lineage in any breed, though a good number of German Shepherds and Doberman Pinchers are C1. It is also found in breeds as diverse as Peruvian Inca Orchids and Pekingese; it is rarely found amongst Labrador Retrievers, Border Collies, Siberian Huskies, or Cocker Spaniels. Despite its fascinating origins, it is widely distributed around the globe, and even shows up frequently among Peruvian village dogs. It almost certainly survived at low frequency in Europe for millennia and then was dispersed outside of Europe by colonialism, though not as successfully as some other lineages.

C7/10

Maya’s Haplotype

Part of the C1 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Pekingese, Boston Terriers, and Rat Terriers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The C1 maternal line is commonly found in Jackals.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Maya inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Maya is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.