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Maggie

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

“Maggie, the Fluffy Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Follow us on instagram @CurbysCorgis”

Place of Birth

Canton, TX, USA

Current Location

St. George, Utah, USA

From

Canton, TX, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 1 wag

Registration

American Canine Association (ACA):

Genetic Breed Result

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Pembroke Welsh Corgi

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a small, energetic, herding dog that is good with families.

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Here’s what Maggie’s family tree may have looked like.
While there may be other possible configurations of her family’s relationships, this is the most likely family tree to explain Maggie’s breed mix.

Breed Reveal Video

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Health Summary

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Maggie is at increased risk for two genetic health conditions.

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

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Maggie inherited both copies of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Maggie has two copies of a variant in SOD1 and is at risk for developing DM. As previously stated, this variant is incompletely penetrant, so while it predisposes Maggie to developing DM, other genetic and environmental factors will determine whether Maggie ultimately develops the disease. Please consult your veterinarian to discuss further diagnostic, monitoring, and supportive care options for Maggie.'

What is Degenerative Myelopathy, DM?

The dog equivalent of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, DM is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord. Because the nerves that control the hind limbs are the first to degenerate, the most common clinical signs are back muscle wasting and gait abnormalities.

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

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Maggie inherited both copies of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Maggie has two copies of an FGF4 retrogene on chromosome 12. In some breeds such as Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds (among others) this variant is found in nearly all dogs. While those breeds are known to have an elevated risk of IVDD, many dogs in those breeds never develop IVDD. For mixed breed dogs and purebreds of other breeds where this variant is not as common, risk for Type I IVDD is greater for individuals with this variant than for similar dogs.

What is Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)?

Type I Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) is a back/spine issue that refers to a health condition affecting the discs that act as cushions between vertebrae. With Type I IVDD, affected dogs can have a disc event where it ruptures or herniates towards the spinal cord. This pressure on the spinal cord causes neurologic signs which can range from a wobbly gait to impairment of movement. Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the relative proportion between a dog’s legs and body, wherein the legs are shorter and the body longer. There are multiple different variants that can cause a markedly chondrodystrophic appearance as observed in Dachshunds and Corgis. However, this particular variant is the only one known to also increase the risk for IVDD.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Von Willebrand Disease Type I, Type I vWD

Identified in Pembroke Welsh Corgis

X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, X-SCID

Identified in Pembroke Welsh Corgis

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, rcd3

Identified in Pembroke Welsh Corgis

Exercise-Induced Collapse, EIC

Identified in Pembroke Welsh Corgis

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Traits

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

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Through Maggie’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C2

Haplotype

C41

Map

C2

Maggie’s Haplogroup

C2 is a very old female lineage found more commonly among English Setters, English Bulldogs, and American Eskimo Dogs. We also see C2 in village dogs in South Asia. Rather than having a few characteristic breeds representing this lineage particularly well, it is present in a few uncommon individuals of many different breeds. Unlike some European breed lineages that have seen skyrocketing popularity along the path to the modern dogs we see today, C2 tends to reflect the deep history of man's best friend.

C41

Maggie’s Haplotype

Part of the C2 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

You can often find his haplogroup in the lovable English Bulldog.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Maggie inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Maggie is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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