Embark logo

Luke

Peekapoo (23.1% unresolved)

“Luke is super smart and super cute. Beauty and brains in one little package.”

Place of Birth
El Paso, Texas, USA

This dog has been viewed 1593 times and been given 22 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Peekapoo (23.1% unresolved)

63.0% Poodle (Small)
13.9% Pekingese
23.1% Unresolved

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Poodle (Small) Poodle (Small)
A highly intelligent and playful dog, Miniature and Toy Poodles make for great lap dogs and companions.
Learn More
Pekingese Pekingese
Pekingese were dogs bred for centuries to be the prized companions of the imperial family of China. Today they are still cherished family companions and show dogs who greet everyone they meet with dignity and grace.
Learn More
Start a conversation! Message this dog’s humans.

Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.2 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
91 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Luke’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Poodle (Small)
Pekingese
Unresolved

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Poodle (Small) mix Poodle (Small) mix Poodle (Small) Pekingese mix Poodle (Small) Pekingese mix Poodle (Small) Poodle (Small) Pekingese mix Mixed Poodle (Small) Poodle (Small) Pekingese mix Mixed

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Luke’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

1
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
168
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal

Luke has two copies of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity. Please inform your veterinarian that Luke has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Luke is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Luke’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

At Risk for 1 genetic condition

Luke has tested positive for 1 of the genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
What does At Risk mean?

Testing positive is predictive of your dog being affected by this condition, but it is not a final diagnosis nor does it predict when symptoms may occur or the severity of a condition in your dog.

Please consult with your veterinarian to determine the best course of action.

Condition List

Chondrodystrophy and Intervertebral Disc Disease, CDDY/IVDD, Type I IVDD
(FGF4 retrogene - CFA12)
Skeletal

Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the "long and low" body shape characteristic of many dog breeds including Dachshunds and Corgis. Recently, a mutation was discovered tha…

Not A Carrier

Good news! Luke is not a carrier for any of the genetic conditions that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Luke tested clear for 6 genetic conditions that are common in his breed mix.
Condition List

Von Willebrand Disease Type I
(VWF)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Luke.

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia
(TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant)
Blood

This is a benign disorder of platelet production that leads to abnormally large, sparse platelets. Affected dogs typically do not suffer any ill effects from the size or …

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Luke.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Luke.

GM2 Gangliosidosis
(HEXB, Poodle Variant)
Multisystem

An early onset form of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause affected dogs to display neurologic signs as puppies or young adults. These include partial or total visi…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Luke.

Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures, NEWS
(ATF2)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A neurologic disease of puppies, affected puppies are often smaller than their unaffected littermates and require intensive nursing care. Without this extra support, pupp…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Luke.

Osteochondrodysplasia, Skeletal Dwarfism
(SLC13A1)
Skeletal

A form of skeletal dwarfism, this causes affected dogs to have abnormally short legs but a normal sized body due to abnormal fetal skeletal maturation. As a fetus, most o…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Luke.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 162

Luke is clear of 162 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Light colored fur (cream to red)
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Likely black colored nose/feet
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
No impact on coat color
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark fur anywhere
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
No impact on coat color
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely furnished (mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely long coat
Shedding
Likely light shedding
Coat Texture
Likely curly coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Intermediate
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance

Through Luke’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A247

Map

A1d

Luke’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A247

Luke’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs in village dogs all over the world. Among the 32 breeds we have sampled it in, the most common occurrences include Boxers, Labrador Retrievers, and Papillons.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

Through Luke’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.1

Map

A1a

Luke’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.1

Luke’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs in village dogs all over the world (outside of Asia), with many occurring in Central and South America. We have found this haplotype frequently in Bernese Mountain Dogs, Australian Shepherds, and Boston Terriers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.