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Lava

Chinese Shar-Pei

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“I'm a mini pei living my best life in sunny FL, rescued by my peirents when I was a puppy. My proudest accomplishments include cool tricks (did I hear treats?), a pet product co. being named after me since I had one-too-many accidents inside (wasn't me!) & turning my family into sharpei snobs. FUN FACT: 1 of my litter mate's moms saw my mom's pics online & recognized me from our breeder! Idk how I wound up a stray in FL but I think it was divine intervention for my peirents to find me.”

Instagram tag
@jssca_skie

Place of Birth

Georgia, USA

Current Location

Tampa, Florida, USA

From

Tampa, FL, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 57 wags

Registration

Microchip: 956000008978266

Genetic Breed Result

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Chinese Shar-Pei

Few dog breeds are more recognizable than the wrinkly Chinese Shar-Pei. This Chinese breed is often compared to a hippopotamus due to its thick muzzle. They also have a characteristic rough, bristly coat, which is how the breed got its name (“Shar-Pei” means “sand skin”). Despite their goofy appearance, Shar-Peis are serious, independent dogs who will loyally protect their owners.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

2.4 % HIGH

Predicted Adult Weight

52 lbs

Genetic Age
84 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

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Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 6/3/2019 changed name from "Lava (AKA Lava-Lu or Lulu)" to "Lava"
  • On 1/5/2019 changed name from "Lava (AKA Lava-Lu & Lulu)" to "Lava (AKA Lava-Lu or Lulu)"
  • On 1/5/2019 changed name from "Lava" to "Lava (AKA Lava-Lu & Lulu)"

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Lava’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Lava is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

And inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Shar-Pei Autoinflammatory Disease, SPAID, Shar-Pei Fever

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Lava inherited both copies of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Lava has two copies of a variant in the MTBP gene and is "At Risk" for showing signs of SPAID. Please consult with your veterinarian to discuss further diagnostics and monitoring so you can keep Lava happy and healthy.

What is Shar-Pei Autoinflammatory Disease, SPAID, Shar-Pei Fever?

More commonly known as Familial Shar-Pei Fever, this autoimmune condition causes recurrent high fevers, joint swelling and pain, and overall malaise. Some Shar-Peis will also develop amyloidosis, an inappropriate accumulation of an abnormal protein, amyloid, in the liver and kidneys.

Primary Open Angle Glaucoma and Primary Lens Luxation

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Lava inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Primary Open Angle Glaucoma and Primary Lens Luxation?

Glaucoma is the result of high intraocular pressure, and if left untreated, can lead to pain and vision loss. The "angle" of primary open glaucoma (POAG) refers to the intersection of the cornea and the iris: this is where aqueous humor (clear fluid filling the eye) must flow to exit the eye. In open angle glaucoma, the iridocorneal angle remains unchanged, and other factors contribute to increased resistance to outflow.

ALT Activity

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Lava inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Lava has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Lava's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Lava’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Additional Genetic Conditions

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Lava’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2

Haplotype

A125

Map

A2

Lava’s Haplogroup

A2 is a very ancient maternal line. Most likely it was one of the major female lines that contributed to the very first domesticated dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Some of the line stayed in Central Asia to the present day, and frequently appear as Tibetan Mastiffs and Akitas. Those that escaped the mountains of Central Asia sought out other cold spots, and are now found among Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. This lineage is also occasionally found in several common Western breeds, such as German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers. Curiously, all New Guinea Singing Dogs descend from this line. These are an ancient and very interesting breed found in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. Unfortunately, they are now endangered. They are closely related to the Australian dingo, so you could say its cousins are dingos! This line is also common in village dogs in Southeast and East Asia. Unlike many other lineages, A2 did not spread across the whole world, probably because it did not have the opportunity to hitch its wagon to European colonialism - or because these dogs just prefer hanging out in mountains, tundras, islands, and other hard-to-reach places!

A125

Lava’s Haplotype

Part of the A2 haplogroup, this haplotype has been found in a Sharpei.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dingos commonly possess this haplogroup.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Lava inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Lava is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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