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Kylo

Mixed Breed

  • Photo of Kylo, an American Pit Bull Terrier, Treeing Walker Coonhound, English Shepherd, and Mixed mix in Cumming, GA, USA Photo of Kylo, an American Pit Bull Terrier, Treeing Walker Coonhound, English Shepherd, and Mixed mix in Cumming, GA, USA
    9 weeks old

“A rescue dog from Georgia! Kylo loves to nap and cuddle hard! Kylo prefers to never be alone and follows us around the house! He is a kisser, especially on the face, and a major cuddle bug! He loves to find smells in the yard and go on walks! He howls up in the air if you get him really excited!”

Place of Birth
Cumming, GA, USA
Current Location
Dacula, Georgia, USA
From
Cumming, GA, USA

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Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

17.5% American Pit Bull Terrier
16.3% Treeing Walker Coonhound
15.6% English Shepherd
8.2% Beagle
6.8% Pointer
6.6% German Shepherd Dog
5.0% Llewellin Setter
24.0% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
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Treeing Walker Coonhound Treeing Walker Coonhound
The Treeing Walker Coonhound is phenomenal hunter and working dog. These hardy hounds were built with unmatched speed and stamina in their respective category. This American breed is mainly used today as a working/hunting dog, but can still make a wonderful companion.
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English Shepherd English Shepherd
A farmer's helper, a loyal companion, a child's shadow: The English Shepherd.
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Beagle Beagle
The Beagle is a scent hound and a great family pet. They are known for being affectionate and having loud voices.
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Pointer Pointer
The Pointer is a hard-working bird dog that is happiest when on the hunt. This is a high-energy breed that will be more than a handful for first-time owners. When given a job and plenty of room to run around, the Pointer can make for a wonderful companion.
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German Shepherd Dog German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.
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Llewellin Setter Llewellin Setter
The Llewellin Setter is widely cherished as one of the best field hunting dogs around. These dogs are well-loved for their hunting prowess, spirit, and sweet dispositions.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
22 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Kylo’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
American Pit Bull Terrier
Treeing Walker Coonhound
English Shepherd
Beagle
Pointer
German Shepherd Dog
Llewellin Setter
Supermutt

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Mixed American Pit Bull Terrier / Treeing Walker Coonhound mix Pointer / Llewellin Setter mix English Shepherd / Beagle mix German Shepherd Dog mix American Pit Bull Terrier Treeing Walker Coonhound Pointer mix Llewellin Setter mix English Shepherd Beagle mix German Shepherd Dog mix Mixed

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Kylo’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Kylo is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

And inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Kylo inherited one copy of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Kylo has one copy of an FGF4 retrogene on chromosome 12. In some breeds such as Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds (among others) this variant is found in nearly all dogs. While those breeds are known to have an elevated risk of IVDD, many dogs in those breeds never develop IVDD. For mixed breed dogs and purebreds of other breeds where this variant is not as common, risk for Type I IVDD is greater for individuals with this variant than for similar dogs.

What is Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)?

Type I Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) is a back/spine issue that refers to a health condition affecting the discs that act as cushions between vertebrae. With Type I IVDD, affected dogs can have a disc event where it ruptures or herniates towards the spinal cord. This pressure on the spinal cord causes neurologic signs which can range from a wobbly gait to impairment of movement. Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the relative proportion between a dog’s legs and body, wherein the legs are shorter and the body longer. There are multiple different variants that can cause a markedly chondrodystrophic appearance as observed in Dachshunds and Corgis. However, this particular variant is the only one known to also increase the risk for IVDD.

Glaucoma

Kylo inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is the result of high intraocular pressure, and if left untreated, can lead to pain and vision loss. The "angle" of primary open glaucoma (POAG) refers to the intersection of the cornea and the iris: this is where aqueous humor (clear fluid filling the eye) must flow to exit the eye. In open angle glaucoma, the iridocorneal angle remains unchanged, and other factors contribute to increased resistance to outflow.


ALT Activity

Kylo inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Kylo has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Kylo's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Kylo’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in English Shepherds and German Shepherd Dogs

Factor VII Deficiency

Identified in Beagles

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III, CLADIII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Identified in Beagles

Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome

Identified in English Shepherds

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in English Shepherds

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1

Identified in Beagles

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in English Shepherds

Cone Degeneration

Identified in Pointers

Day Blindness

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Glaucoma

Identified in Beagles

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers, English Shepherds, and more

Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome, MPS VII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 8, NCL 8

Identified in Llewellin Setters

Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration

Identified in Beagles

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in American Pit Bull Terriers

Acral Mutilation Syndrome

Identified in Pointers

Hypocatalasia, Acatalasemia

Identified in Beagles

Cobalamin Malabsorption

Identified in Beagles

Musladin-Lueke Syndrome

Identified in Beagles

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Beagles

Additional Genetic Conditions

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely light to moderate shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Kylo’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2

Haplotype

A125

Map

A2

Kylo’s Haplogroup

A2 is a very ancient maternal line. Most likely it was one of the major female lines that contributed to the very first domesticated dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Some of the line stayed in Central Asia to the present day, and frequently appear as Tibetan Mastiffs and Akitas. Those that escaped the mountains of Central Asia sought out other cold spots, and are now found among Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. This lineage is also occasionally found in several common Western breeds, such as German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers. Curiously, all New Guinea Singing Dogs descend from this line. These are an ancient and very interesting breed found in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. Unfortunately, they are now endangered. They are closely related to the Australian dingo, so you could say its cousins are dingos! This line is also common in village dogs in Southeast and East Asia. Unlike many other lineages, A2 did not spread across the whole world, probably because it did not have the opportunity to hitch its wagon to European colonialism - or because these dogs just prefer hanging out in mountains, tundras, islands, and other hard-to-reach places!

A125

Kylo’s Haplotype

Part of the A2 haplogroup, this haplotype has been found in a Sharpei.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dingos commonly possess this haplogroup.

Through Kylo’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2a

Haplotype

Hc.5

Map

A2a

Kylo’s Haplogroup

A2a is a truly ancient lineage. Unlike the recent upstart A1 lineages which found their way from a few popular European males a couple hundred years ago into many dogs in many breeds, A2a shows ancient roots without major recent expansion. It is likely one of the oldest eastern Eurasian male lineages of dogs, where it has existed for thousands of years. Nowadays, it's commonly found in Tibetan Terriers and Chow Chows as well as in Southeastern Asian village dogs. The Chow Chow seems to have been depicted in sculpture over 2,000 years ago, so this is an ancient lineage indeed, and dogs with it have a long and noble pedigree! Males from this lineage have continued to be bred in similar forms and breeds for millennia.

Hc.5

Kylo’s Haplotype

Part of the A2a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Chow Chows and village dogs from Papua New Guinea.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The large-sized Tibetan Mastiff descends from this ancient lineage.