What is Embark?

Koga

Mixed Breed

“Koga was rescued in the summer of 2016 from Ulleung-do 울릉도, a remote island off the east coast of South Korea. We met Koga by chance in Seoul, and he has since lived with us in Seoul, Toronto, and Los Angeles. Koga is an excellent traveler and loving companion. He is intelligent and attentive to his humans, docile and loyal. His unusual, wild appearance often invites questions about his breed background, to which we have come to answer: “Probably fox. Maybe Pomeranian. Maybe part red panda.””

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Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

50.0% East Asian Village Dog
50.0% Miniature Schnauzer

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from this distant ancestor:

East Asian Village Dog East Asian Village Dog
Many years ago, when wolves began scavenging our hunting camps, they became gradually attuned to human life. Genetic changes in those wolves over time led to tameness, small body size and early age of first reproduction that soon after yielded what we see today in the East Asian village dogs.
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Miniature Schnauzer Miniature Schnauzer
Miniature Schnauzers are an alert and spirited breed with guard dog tendencies.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 2.5 % HIGH Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 15 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 48 human years Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Koga’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
East Asian Village Dog
Miniature Schnauzer

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Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
167
CLEAR
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Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) Activity result: Normal
Koga has two normal alleles at ALT.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Koga did not test positive for any of the genetic diseases that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Koga’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Koga is not a carrier for any of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Koga tested clear for 3 genetic conditions that are common in his breed mix.
Condition List

Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome
(AMHR2)
Other Systems

A developmental syndrome of the Miniature and Standard Schnauzers, this causes male dogs to develop parts of the female reproductive tract, which understandably can cause…

Seen in Miniature Schnauzers, but not Koga.

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in Miniature Schnauzers, but not Koga.

Myotonia Congenita
(CLCN1 Exon 7)
Muscular

This condition is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction and stiffness that usually resolves with normal exercise, though physical therapy can be beneficial. The g…

Seen in Miniature Schnauzers, but not Koga.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 164

Koga is clear of 164 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

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Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Agouti (Wolf Sable) coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely long coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Likely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Intermediate
Body Size 3
Smaller
Body Size 4
Smaller
Body Size 5
Larger

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance

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Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Koga’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A240

Map

A1b

Koga’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A240

Koga’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1b haplogroup, this haplotype has been spotted in village dogs in Portugal, Costa Rica, and Brazil. Among the breeds we have seen it in, it occurs most often in Miniature Schnauzers, Pugs, and Maltese. Not confined to small breeds, we also see this haplotype in Pharaoh Hounds and Ibizan Hounds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

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Traits

Paternal Haplotype

Through Koga’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C

Haplotype

Hb.3

Map

C

Koga’s Haplogroup

C is a relatively rare paternal lineage. The dog populations which bear C are a disparate bunch. The Akita and Shiba Inu are Japanese breeds, the former of which seems to have roots in the Jomon population of hunter-gatherers which were present in the islands of Japan before the ancestors of the modern Japanese arrived. The New Guinea Singing Dog, Samoyed, and Alaska Malamute are all disparate breeds that also represent the C lineage. One village dog from Peru also bore this lineage. This wide distribution and diversity suggest C is not a recently expanded lineage. It likely represents a canid lineage which diversified sometime around the Last Glacial Maximum, when the dogs of Siberia and Oceania split off and went their separate ways.

Hb.3

Koga’s Haplotype

Part of the C haplogroup, we have spotted this haplotype in village dogs in Peru. In breed dogs, this haplotype is confined to the Samoyed and Keeshond, making it a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The Shiba Inu descends from this relativey rare haplogroup.

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Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype