What is Embark?

Koda

Australian Cattle Dog

Chat

“Koda is my lovely little shadow. He is determined and so smart! He's a lot of fun but I have to make sure I tire him out. He's doing great in agility and he's excelling at nosework too. My favorite Koda trick is the high-five. He loves the water and hiking. He loves swimming in the ocean to fetch his favorite toy. And of course he loves herding things, be that other dogs, people, or actual sheep. Insta: @kya_and_koda”

Instagram tag
@kya_and_koda

This dog has been viewed 822 times and been given 11 wags

Registration

AKC: PAL269794
Microchip: 985112006381435

Genetic Breed Result

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Australian Cattle Dog

100.0% Australian Cattle Dog
Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 2.0 % HIGH Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 50 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 33 human years Learn More

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Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Summary

0
AT RISK
1
CARRIER
157
CLEAR
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Clinical traits

These genetic traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal
This result helps your vet understand what your dog's baseline ALT activity is. The enzyme alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, is commonly used to evaluate liver health. Do…
Koda has one copy of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Koda has this …

Not At Risk

Good news! Koda did not test positive for any of the genetic diseases that Embark screens for. Read on to learn more about the conditions we test for, but rest assured that Koda does not have the mutations known to cause them.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Koda’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future. Many other diseases caused by environmental factors or undiscovered genetic variants can cause symptoms similar to diseases we test for. By ruling out these mutations, your veterinarian will be able to find the true cause more quickly. Your veterinarian will also know they can safely prescribe medications some dogs are sensitive to.

Carrier for 1 genetic condition

Koda is a carrier for 1 of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
What does Carrier mean?

Koda has inherited a recessive allele for a genetic trait or mutation. This is not enough to cause symptoms of the disease, but is important to bear in mind if Koda ever has children.

Condition List

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Common Conditions

Good news! Koda tested clear for 7 genetic conditions that are common in his breed.
Condition List

Primary Lens Luxation
(ADAMTS17)
Eyes

This surgically correctable condition causes the lens to spontaneously detach from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity and irritation …

Cystinuria Type II-A
(SLC3A1)
Kidney and Bladder

A disease of cystine accumulation, affected dogs are prone to developing cystine kidney and bladder stones, which if caught early can be managed with dietary changes, inc…

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1
(CLN5 Exon 4 Variant 1)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(CLN8)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Myotonia Congenita
(CLCN1 Exon 23)
Muscular

This condition is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction and stiffness that usually resolves with normal exercise, though physical therapy can be beneficial. The g…

Malignant Hyperthermia
(RYR1)
Metabolic

This condition only manifests if affected dogs are treated with certain inhalant anesthetics, and can cause uncontrollable muscle contractions and a dangerous increase in…

Other Conditions: Clear of 150

Koda is clear of 150 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

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Traits

Maternal Haplotype

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Coat Color

A number of genes are known to affect coat color in dogs, and they all interact. In some cases, other genetic effects may also influence color and pattern.

Trait
Result
 
E Locus (Mask, Grizzle, Recessive Red)
EmE or Eme
K Locus (Dominant Black)
kyky
A Locus (Agouti, Sable)
aa or ata or atat
D Locus (Dilute, Blue, Fawn)
DD
B Locus (Brown, Chocolate, Liver, Red)
BB

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Color genes:

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings, shedding and curls are all genetic! And they all interact, too. In fact, the combination of these genes explains the coat phenotypes of 90% of AKC registered dog breeds.

Trait
Result
 
Long Haircoat (FGF5)
GG
Shedding (MC5R)
CC
Curly Coat (KRT71)
CC
Hairlessness (FOXI3)
LINKAGE
N/N

More information on coat type genetics: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2897713/figure/F3/

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Traits genes:

Other Body Features

Trait
Result
 
Brachycephaly (BMP3)
AC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
CC
Blue Eye Color
LINKAGE
N/N

Body Size

Body size is a complex trait that is affected by both genetic and environmental variation. Our genetic analysis includes genes that, together, explain over 80% of the variation in dog body size. It does not account for runting or stunting; nor does it account for the interactions between various genes both known and unknown.

Trait
Result
 
Body Size - IGF1
NI
Body Size - IGF1R
GG
Body Size - STC2
TA
Body Size - GHR (E195K)
GA
Body Size - GHR (P177L)
CC

Other Embark dogs with these Body Size genes:

Performance

Trait
Result
 
Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
GG

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Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Koda’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A247

Map

A1d

Koda’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A247

Koda’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs in village dogs all over the world. Among the 32 breeds we have sampled it in, the most common occurrences include Boxers, Labrador Retrievers, and Papillons.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

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Paternal Haplotype

Through Koda’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.20

Map

A1a

Koda’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.20

Koda’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs in village dogs throughout the world (outside of Asia). It is quite common in breed dogs, occurring frequently in Golden Retrievers, Irish Wolfhounds, Scottish Terriers, Border Collies, and Mastiffs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

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Traits

Maternal Haplotype