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Kima

Great Pyrenees

No bio has been provided yet

Place of Birth
Sunbury, PA, USA
Location
Pennsylvania, USA

This dog has been viewed 407 times and been given 40 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Great Pyrenees

100.0% Great Pyrenees
Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees
The Great Pyrenees is an exceptionally loving dog whose primary function is to protect sheep, goats, livestock, people, children, grass, flowers, the moon, lawn furniture, and any real or imaginary predators that may intrude on your personal space. They have a strong build and an amazing thick white coat that exudes elegance and majesty. They make a great family dog because of their intelligence and steady temperament.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

2.4 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight

85 lbs Learn More

Genetic Age
29 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

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Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Kima’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
171
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) Activity result: Low Normal

Kima has one copy of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Kima has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Kima is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Kima’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Kima did not test positive for any of the genetic conditions that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Kima’s diagnosis and treatment if she gets sick in the future.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Kima is not a carrier for any of the genetic conditions that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Kima tested clear for 1 genetic conditions that are common in her breed.
Condition List

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy
cmr1 (BEST1 Exon 2)
Eyes

This is a non-progressive retinal disease that, in rare cases, can lead to vision loss. CMR is typically only identified when a vet examines the eye which, in dogs with C…

Other Conditions:
Clear of 170

Kima is clear of 170 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Agouti (Wolf Sable) coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely long coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Likely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Larger
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance

Through Kima’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A25

Map

A1e

Kima’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A25

Kima’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we have detected this haplotype in village dogs in Mexico. We also see it in Irish Wolfhounds, Great Pyrenees, Brittanys, and Labrador Retrievers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Kima is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.