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Kersey

Border Collie

“Kersey is a Border Collie bred by Mission Falls Ranch in Montana. She was born October 2nd, 2017! This little pup will grow up exploring the Montana wilderness and competing in agility, dock diving, herding, and any sports she takes to! We are excited to embark on this journey, follow our adventures on instagram.com/VinceandKersey chronicles”

Instagram tag
@vinceandkerseychronicles

This dog has been viewed 1037 times and been given 16 wags

Registration

American Border Collie Association: 454747
Microchip: 844871618

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Border Collie

100.0% Border Collie
Border Collie Border Collie
Border Collies are highly energetic and work oriented herding dogs, whose stamina is matched by their intelligence and alertness. If you want the smartest dog out there, then you have come to the right place!
Learn More
Start a conversation! Message this dog’s owner.

Genetic Stats


Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
28 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided
Changes to this dog’s profile
Learn More
  • On 1/20/2018 changed handle from "mfrkersey2" to "kersey"
  • On 2/18/2018 changed name from "MFR Kersey" to "Kersey"

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Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Kersey’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Coat Color

Coat Color

E Locus (MC1R)
Can have a melanistic mask (EmEm)
K Locus (CBD103)
More likely to have a patterned haircoat (kyky)
A Locus (ASIP)
Black/Brown and tan coat color pattern (atat)
D Locus (MLPH)
Dark areas of hair and skin are not lightened (DD)
B Locus (TYRP1)
Brown hair and skin (bb)
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings (RSPO2) LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows) (II)
Coat Length (FGF5)
Likely long coat (TT)
Shedding (MC5R)
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding (CC)
Coat Texture (KRT71)
Likely straight coat (CC)
Hairlessness (FOXI3) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (SLC45A2) LINKAGE
Likely not albino (NN)
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length (BMP3)
Likely medium or long muzzle (CC)
Tail Length (T)
Likely normal-length tail (CC)
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
Likely to have hind dew claws (CT)
Blue Eye Color (ALX4) LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes (NN)
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size (IGF1)
Smaller (II)
Body Size (IGFR1)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (STC2)
Larger (TT)
Body Size (GHR - E191K)
Smaller (AA)
Body Size (GHR - P177L)
Larger (CC)
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
Normal altitude tolerance (GG)
Appetite (POMC) LINKAGE
Normal food motivation (NN)

Through Kersey’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C2

Haplotype

C21

Map

C2

Kersey’s Haplogroup

C2 is a very old female lineage found more commonly among English Setters, English Bulldogs, and American Eskimo Dogs. We also see C2 in village dogs in South Asia. Rather than having a few characteristic breeds representing this lineage particularly well, it is present in a few uncommon individuals of many different breeds. Unlike some European breed lineages that have seen skyrocketing popularity along the path to the modern dogs we see today, C2 tends to reflect the deep history of man's best friend.

C21

Kersey’s Haplotype

Part of the C2 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Border Collies, Australian Cattle Dogs, and village dogs in Fiji.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

You can often find his haplogroup in the lovable English Bulldog.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Kersey inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Kersey is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.