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Kamora

American Bully

“Kamora is fun loving & loyal”

Place of Birth

South Carolina, USA

Current Location

South Carolina, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 0 wags

Registration

N/A : EM-65622400

Genetic Breed Result

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American Bully

The American Bully may look intimidating with its muscular build, but these dogs are bred to be the ideal family or companion dog. This breed is notable for coming in several different size and type varieties, so there's a lot of diversity in their appearance. They're a newer breed, originating in the 80s and 90s in the United States.

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Start a conversation! Message this dog’s owner.

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Here’s what Kamora’s family tree may have looked like.
While there may be other possible configurations of her family’s relationships, this is the most likely family tree to explain Kamora’s breed mix.

Breed Reveal Video

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Health Summary

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Kamora inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1

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Kamora inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This variant should not impact Kamora’s health. This variant is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that a dog needs two copies of the variant to show signs of this condition. Kamora is unlikely to develop this condition due to this variant because she only has one copy of the variant.

Impact on Breeding

Your dog carries this variant and will pass it on to ~50% of her offspring. You can email breeders@embarkvet.com to discuss with a genetic counselor how the genotype results should be applied to a breeding program.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1?

PRA-CRD4/cord1 is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss over a 1-2 year period. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of cone cells, causing day blindness before night blindness.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1 (PDE6B, American Staffordshire Terrier Variant)

Identified in American Bullies

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy, cmr1 (BEST1 Exon 2)

Identified in American Bullies

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones (SLC2A9)

Identified in American Bullies

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A (ARSG Exon 2, American Staffordshire Terrier Variant)

Identified in American Bullies

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 10, NCL 10 (CTSD Exon 5, American Bulldog Variant)

Identified in American Bullies

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA (L2HGDH, Staffordshire Bull Terrier Variant)

Identified in American Bullies

Ichthyosis (NIPAL4, American Bulldog Variant)

Identified in American Bullies

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Traits

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Kamora’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A361/409/611

Map

A1b

Kamora’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A361/409/611

Kamora’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in German Shepherd Dogs, Poodles, and Shiloh Shepherds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Kamora inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Kamora is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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