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Jiminy

Mixed Breed

“I adopted Jiminy in 2010. His first owner found him in a church parking lot on Easter morning in 2005.They kept him for 5 years on a 12 acre farm and named him "Pretty Boy. They surrendered him to the West Virginia Humane Society when he contracted giardia and they couldn't afford to take him to the vet. He now lives in the city with me in a condo building. At first he was afraid of the elevator in my building; now he hits the door with his paw when the elevator doesn't come fast enough.”

Current Location
Washington, District of Columbia, USA
From
Berkeley County, WV, USA

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Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

40.6% Chihuahua
24.5% Pomeranian
16.5% Bichon Frise
9.0% Japanese Chin
5.2% Chow Chow
4.2% Norwegian Elkhound
Chihuahua Chihuahua
Chihuahuas have a huge personality that defies their tiny frame, known to be highly active and intelligent canines.
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Pomeranian Pomeranian
The Pomeranian is a cocky, animated companion with an extroverted personality.
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Bichon Frise Bichon Frise
The Bichon Frise is a hypoallergenic, fluffy, white companion breed with a charismatic, cheerful temperament. Known for their clownish antics, the Bichon Frise can put a smile on anyone's face.
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Japanese Chin Japanese Chin
The Japanese Chin is a little breed that was born to rule the roost. Though Chinese in origin, these dogs were brought to Japan to serve as the companions of Japanese dignitaries. This is a loving dog that knows it is the real deal.
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Chow Chow Chow Chow
This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. Often aloof and suspicious of strangers, the Chow Chow may not be a cuddle buddy, but for the right person, they are a fiercely loyal companion.
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Norwegian Elkhound Norwegian Elkhound
The Norwegian Elkhound was the main companion of the Vikings. These guys have been used in almost every role imaginable for a dog. In modern times, they are primarily companion dogs, but they are still used for hunting and herding.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
103 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Jiminy’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Chihuahua
Pomeranian
Bichon Frise
Japanese Chin
Chow Chow
Norwegian Elkhound

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Chihuahua mix Pomeranian mix Chihuahua Chihuahua / Chow Chow mix Pomeranian Bichon Frise / Japanese Chin mix Chihuahua Chihuahua Chihuahua Chow Chow mix Pomeranian Pomeranian Bichon Frise Japanese Chin mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Jiminy’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

0
AT RISK
1
CARRIER
162
CLEAR
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Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal

Jiminy has one copy of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Jiminy has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Jiminy is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Jiminy’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Jiminy did not test positive for any of the genetic conditions that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Jiminy’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future.

Carrier for
1 genetic condition

Jiminy is a carrier for 1 of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
What does Carrier mean?

Jiminy has inherited a recessive allele for a genetic trait or mutation. This is not enough to cause symptoms of the disease, but is important to bear in mind if Jiminy ever has children.

Condition List

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Common Conditions

Good news! Jiminy tested clear for 11 genetic conditions that are common in his breed mix.
Condition List

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia
(TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant)
Blood

This is a benign disorder of platelet production that leads to abnormally large, sparse platelets. Affected dogs typically do not suffer any ill effects from the size or …

Seen in Chihuahuas, Bichon Frises, but not Jiminy.

Canine Elliptocytosis
(SPTB Exon 30)
Blood

A benign disease that affects red blood cell shape, elliptocytosis rarely causes symptoms. Upon examination of a blood smear, however, affected dogs have elongated, oval …

Seen in Chow Chows, but not Jiminy.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, rcd3
Rod-cone dysplasia, rcd3 (PDE6A)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Pomeranians, but not Jiminy.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1
(RPGRIP1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Chihuahuas, but not Jiminy.

Glaucoma
Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (ADAMTS10 Exon 9)
Eyes

A disease that affects humans and dogs alike; this is an adult-onset, medically manageable condition that causes high intraocular pressure (IOP). If left untreated, it ca…

Seen in Norwegian Elkhounds, but not Jiminy.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(MFSD8)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Chihuahuas, but not Jiminy.

GM1 Gangliosidosis
(GLB1 Exon 15 Shiba Inu Variant)
Multisystem

An early onset form of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause affected dogs to display neurologic signs as puppies or young adults. These include partial or total visi…

Seen in Japanese Chins, but not Jiminy.

GM2 Gangliosidosis
(HEXA)
Multisystem

An early onset form of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause affected dogs to display neurologic signs as puppies or young adults. These include partial or total visi…

Seen in Japanese Chins, but not Jiminy.

Spinocerebellar Ataxia with Myokymia and/or Seizures
(KCNJ10)
Brain and Spinal Cord

Known as the “oldest” (even reptiles and more ancient species have them!) part of the brain, the cerebellum fine-tunes motor signals from the brain to the muscles, allowi…

Seen in Chihuahuas, but not Jiminy.

Hereditary Vitamin D-Resistant Rickets
(VDR)
Skeletal

A disease of insufficient calcium absorption, this can cause lameness and skeletal abnormalities; however, if diagnosed early it can be successfully managed. Calcium abso…

Seen in Pomeranians, but not Jiminy.

Chondrodystrophy and Intervertebral Disc Disease, CDDY/IVDD, Type I IVDD
(FGF4 retrogene - CFA12)
Skeletal

Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the "long and low" body shape characteristic of many dog breeds including Dachshunds and Corgis. Recently, a mutation was discovered tha…

Seen in Chihuahuas, Bichon Frises, but not Jiminy.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 151

Jiminy is clear of 151 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
No Call
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Smaller
Body Size 5
Smaller
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance

Through Jiminy’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A2a

Map

A1e

Jiminy’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A2a

Jiminy’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs up and down the Americas as well as French Polynesia. Among the breed dogs we have detected it in, we see it most frequently in English Springer Spaniels, Papillons, and Collies.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

Through Jiminy’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

Ha.4

Map

A1b

Jiminy’s Haplogroup

For most of dog history, this haplogroup was probably quite rare. However, a couple hundred years ago it seems to have found its way into a prized male guard dog in Europe who had many offspring, including the ancestors of many European guard breeds such as Doberman Pinchers, St. Bernards, and Great Danes. Despite being rare, many of the most imposing dogs on Earth have it; strangely, so do many Pomeranians! Perhaps this explains why some Poms are so tough, acting like they're ten times their actual size! This lineage is most commonly found in working dogs, in particular guard dogs. With origins in Europe, it spread widely across other regions as Europeans took their dogs across the world.

Ha.4

Jiminy’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype is found in village dogs in North America and Africa. As for breeds, it occurs most frequently in Miniature Pinscher, Great Dane, and Poodle.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Great Danes and Pomeranians have this in common!