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Jezzy

Mixed Breed

“Adopted. Her OE Sheepdog heritage is evident in the way she herds us around, and always tries to position herself equidistant between the two of us. No fan of water - HATES getting her little white feet wet. Not a mean bone in her body. Runs the household.”

Current Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

This dog has been viewed 458 times and been given 0 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

50.0% Boxer
50.0% Old English Sheepdog
Boxer Boxer
Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dog-patient, loyal and smart-requiring lots of exercise and proper training.
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Old English Sheepdog Old English Sheepdog
The Old English Sheepdog is a spirited breed that likes to show of its working ability and that amazing shaggy coat. These guys have been around since the early 1800's and are still best used as herding dogs. They can make great family pets as long as you are ready to fill their exercise and grooming needs.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.6 % LOW Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight

54 lbs Learn More

Genetic Age
102 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Jezzy’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Boxer
Old English Sheepdog

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Jezzy’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Through Jezzy’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A316

Map

A1b

Jezzy’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A316

Jezzy’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1b haplogroup, we see this haplotype most frequently in Old English Sheepdogs. It’s a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Jezzy is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.