Embark logo

“Jason”
Nami no Aima go Shikinosou TKN

Kishu Ken

“Jason is a Finnish import Kishu Ken from parents imported to Finland from Japan. He has nice substance and is quite sensitive and easy-going for his breed. He loves tricks!”

Place of Birth
Lammi, Finland
Current Location
Oregon City, OR, USA
From
Lammi, Finland

This dog has been viewed 226 times and been given 0 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Kishu Ken

100.0% Kishu Ken
Kishu Ken Kishu Ken
The Kishu, sometimes called Kishu Ken or Kishu Inu, is a Japanese breed of dog, developed there for thousands of years. It is descended from ancient medium-sized breeds and named after the Kishu region, now Mie Prefecture and Wakayama Prefecture.
Learn More
Start a conversation! Message this dog’s owner.

Genetic Stats


Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
26 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided
Changes to this dog’s profile
Learn More
  • On 3/2/2018 changed name from "Jason" to "Nami no Aima go Shikinosou"

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Breed Reveal Video

Loading...

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Jason’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
174
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal

Nami no Aima go Shikinosou has two copies of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity. Please inform your veterinarian that Nami no Aima go Shikinosou has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Nami no Aima go Shikinosou is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Nami no Aima go Shikinosou’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Jason did not test positive for any of the genetic conditions that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Jason’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Jason is not a carrier for any of the genetic conditions that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Jason tested clear for 7 other common genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Primary Lens Luxation
(ADAMTS17)
Eyes

This surgically correctable condition causes the lens to spontaneously detach from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity and irritation …

Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis, HUU
(SLC2A9)
Kidney and Bladder

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate; if caught early, it is responsive to dietary management. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabol…

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM1
(PDK4)
Heart

The most common acquired heart disease of dogs, this is a progressive disease of the heart ventricles: early diagnosis and treatment is key. The ventricles are the heavil…

Exercise-Induced Collapse
(DNM1)
Muscular

First characterized in field-trial lines of Labrador Retriever dogs, this muscle disorder can cause episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes collapse; after recovering, …

Other Conditions:
Clear of 167

Jason is clear of 167 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Coat Color

Coat Color

E Locus (MC1R)
No dark hairs anywhere (ee)
K Locus (CBD103)
Not expressed (kyky)
A Locus (ASIP)
Not expressed (awaw)
D Locus (MLPH)
Not expressed (DD)
B Locus (TYRP1)
Likely black colored nose/feet (BB)
Saddle Tan (RALY)
Not expressed (NN)
M Locus (PMEL)
No merle alleles (mm)
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings (RSPO2) LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows) (II)
Coat Length (FGF5)
Likely short or mid-length coat (GG)
Shedding (MC5R)
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding (CT)
Coat Texture (KRT71)
Likely straight coat (CC)
Hairlessness (FOXI3) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Hairlessness (SGK3)
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (SLC45A2) LINKAGE
Likely not albino (NN)
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length (BMP3)
Likely medium or long muzzle (CC)
Tail Length (T)
Likely normal-length tail (CC)
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
Unlikely to have hind dew claws (CC)
Blue Eye Color (ALX4) LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes (NN)
Back Muscling & Bulk, Large Breed (ACSL4)
Likely normal muscling (CC)
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size (IGF1)
Intermediate (NI)
Body Size (IGFR1)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (STC2)
Larger (TT)
Body Size (GHR - E195K)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (GHR - P177L)
Larger (CC)
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
Normal altitude tolerance (GG)

Through Jason’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2

Haplotype

A515

Map

A2

Nami no Aima go Shikinosou’s Haplogroup

A2 is a very ancient maternal line. Most likely it was one of the major female lines that contributed to the very first domesticated dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Some of the line stayed in Central Asia to the present day, and frequently appear as Tibetan Mastiffs and Akitas. Those that escaped the mountains of Central Asia sought out other cold spots, and are now found among Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. This lineage is also occasionally found in several common Western breeds, such as German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers. Curiously, all New Guinea Singing Dogs descend from this line. These are an ancient and very interesting breed found in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. Unfortunately, they are now endangered. They are closely related to the Australian dingo, so you could say its cousins are dingos! This line is also common in village dogs in Southeast and East Asia. Unlike many other lineages, A2 did not spread across the whole world, probably because it did not have the opportunity to hitch its wagon to European colonialism - or because these dogs just prefer hanging out in mountains, tundras, islands, and other hard-to-reach places!

A515

Nami no Aima go Shikinosou’s Haplotype

Part of the A2 haplogroup, the A515 haplotype occurs most commonly in East Asian Village Dogs. It's a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dingos commonly possess this haplogroup.

Through Jason’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C

Haplotype

H5b

Map

C

Nami no Aima go Shikinosou’s Haplogroup

C is a relatively rare paternal lineage. The dog populations which bear C are a disparate bunch. The Akita and Shiba Inu are Japanese breeds, the former of which seems to have roots in the Jomon population of hunter-gatherers which were present in the islands of Japan before the ancestors of the modern Japanese arrived. The New Guinea Singing Dog, Samoyed, and Alaska Malamute are all disparate breeds that also represent the C lineage. One village dog from Peru also bore this lineage. This wide distribution and diversity suggest C is not a recently expanded lineage. It likely represents a canid lineage which diversified sometime around the Last Glacial Maximum, when the dogs of Siberia and Oceania split off and went their separate ways.

H5b

Nami no Aima go Shikinosou’s Haplotype

Part of the C haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Shiba Inus.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The Shiba Inu descends from this relativey rare haplogroup.