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Indy

Mixed Breed

“I adopted Indy from New Hope Cattle Dog Rescue in Colorado. Her mom was rescued in Texas and brought here to CO, and Indy was born into foster care, and I adopted her at 8wks in August 2016. She is energetic, clever as a velociraptor in Jurassic Park, a spectacular jumper, the most cuddly, and she has the BIGGEST EARS. She’s 35lbs of love.”

Place of Birth
Parker, CO, USA
Current Location
Colorado, USA

This dog has been viewed 266 times and been given 0 wags

Registration

Microchip: 982000406906876

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

44.6% Australian Cattle Dog
25.6% Boxer
11.5% Border Collie
8.3% Dalmatian
10.0% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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Boxer Boxer
Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dog-patient, loyal and smart-requiring lots of exercise and proper training.
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Border Collie Border Collie
Border Collies are highly energetic and work oriented herding dogs, whose stamina is matched by their intelligence and alertness. If you want the smartest dog out there, then you have come to the right place!
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Dalmatian Dalmatian
Best known as the star of Disney’s 101 Dalmatians, this sleek and athletic dog breed has a history that goes back several hundred years. He started out as a coach dog but has also served in many other capacities, including hunter, firehouse dog, and circus performer. As charming in life as in film, he goes from gallant to goofy to gallant again in the blink of an eye, and loves to be a part of everything his family does.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.8 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
34 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Indy’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Australian Cattle Dog
Boxer
Border Collie
Dalmatian
Supermutt

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Australian Cattle Dog mix Boxer mix Australian Cattle Dog Border Collie mix Boxer Australian Cattle Dog / Dalmatian mix Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog Border Collie Mixed Boxer Boxer Australian Cattle Dog Dalmatian mix

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Indy’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

1
AT RISK
1
CARRIER
172
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical Tools

These clinical tools are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Normal
Indy has two normal alleles at ALT.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

At Risk for 1 genetic condition

Indy has tested positive for 1 of the genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
What does At Risk mean?

Testing positive is predictive of your dog being affected by this condition, but it is not a final diagnosis nor does it predict when symptoms may occur or the severity of a condition in your dog.

Please consult with your veterinarian to determine the best course of action.

Condition List

Chondrodystrophy and Intervertebral Disc Disease, CDDY/IVDD, Type I IVDD
(FGF4 retrogene - CFA12)
Skeletal

Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the "long and low" body shape characteristic of many dog breeds including Dachshunds and Corgis. Recently, a mutation was discovered tha…

Carrier for
1 genetic condition

Indy is a carrier for 1 of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
What does Carrier mean?

Indy has inherited a recessive allele for a genetic trait or mutation. This is not enough to cause symptoms of the disease, but is important to bear in mind if Indy ever has children.

Condition List

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Common Conditions

Good news! Indy tested clear for 13 genetic conditions that are common in her breed mix.
Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, Border Collies, but not Indy.

Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A
(F8 Exon 10, Boxer Variant)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Seen in Boxers, but not Indy.

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia
(TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant)
Blood

This is a benign disorder of platelet production that leads to abnormally large, sparse platelets. Affected dogs typically do not suffer any ill effects from the size or …

Seen in Boxers, but not Indy.

Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome
(VPS13B)
Blood

Dogs with TNS are prone to recurrent bacterial infections that must be recognized and treated early. Neutrophils, a type of white blood cells, are generated in the bone m…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Indy.

Collie Eye Anomaly, Choroidal Hypoplasia, CEA
(NHEJ1)
Eyes

Named for its high prevalence in Collie dogs, Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) is more correctly termed choroidal hypoplasia and is a developmental disease of the choroid. The ch…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, Border Collies, but not Indy.

Primary Lens Luxation
(ADAMTS17)
Eyes

This surgically correctable condition causes the lens to spontaneously detach from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity and irritation …

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, Border Collies, but not Indy.

Cystinuria Type II-A
(SLC3A1)
Kidney and Bladder

A disease of cystine accumulation, affected dogs are prone to developing cystine kidney and bladder stones, which if caught early can be managed with dietary changes, inc…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Indy.

Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis, HUU
(SLC2A9)
Kidney and Bladder

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate; if caught early, it is responsive to dietary management. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabol…

Seen in Dalmatians, but not Indy.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 1
(CLN5 Border Collie Variant)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, Border Collies, but not Indy.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(CLN8 Australian Shepherd Variant)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Indy.

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in Boxers, but not Indy.

Myotonia Congenita
(CLCN1 Exon 23)
Muscular

This condition is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction and stiffness that usually resolves with normal exercise, though physical therapy can be beneficial. The g…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, Border Collies, but not Indy.

Imerslund-Grasbeck Syndrome, Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption
(CUBN Exon 53)
Gastrointestinal

This is a treatable gastrointestinal disease where dogs cannot absorb cobalamin, often causing them to be runty with poor energy levels. Cobalamin is required for synthes…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Indy.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 159

Indy is clear of 159 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Black/Brown and tan coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Saddle Tan
Likely saddle tan patterned
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Indy’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A427

Map

A1e

Indy’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A427

Indy’s Haplotype

Part of the A1e haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Australian Cattle Dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Indy inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Indy is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.