MELBOURNE

New Guinea Singing Dog

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This dog has been viewed 988 times and been given 2 wags

Registration

Microchip: 981020021572590

Genetic Breed Result

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New Guinea Singing Dog

100.0% New Guinea Singing Dog
New Guinea Singing Dog New Guinea Singing Dog
The New Guinea Singing Dog is the rarest breed in the world. These dogs have very ancient origins and share a strong resemblance to the Australian dingo.
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Genetic Stats


Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
60 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided
Changes to this dog’s profile
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  • On 11/10/2018 changed name from "MELBOURNE - 2ND swab" to "MELBOURNE"
  • On 7/14/2018 changed name from "TBD" to "MELBOURNE - 2ND swab"
  • On 6/8/2018 changed name from "Hopa" to "TBD"

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Through MELBOURNE’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2

Haplotype

A222

Map

A2

MELBOURNE’s Haplogroup

A2 is a very ancient maternal line. Most likely it was one of the major female lines that contributed to the very first domesticated dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Some of the line stayed in Central Asia to the present day, and frequently appear as Tibetan Mastiffs and Akitas. Those that escaped the mountains of Central Asia sought out other cold spots, and are now found among Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. This lineage is also occasionally found in several common Western breeds, such as German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers. Curiously, all New Guinea Singing Dogs descend from this line. These are an ancient and very interesting breed found in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. Unfortunately, they are now endangered. They are closely related to the Australian dingo, so you could say its cousins are dingos! This line is also common in village dogs in Southeast and East Asia. Unlike many other lineages, A2 did not spread across the whole world, probably because it did not have the opportunity to hitch its wagon to European colonialism - or because these dogs just prefer hanging out in mountains, tundras, islands, and other hard-to-reach places!

A222

MELBOURNE’s Haplotype

Part of the A2 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in New Guinea Singing Dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dingos commonly possess this haplogroup.

Through MELBOURNE’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

C

Haplotype

Hb.1

Map

C

MELBOURNE’s Haplogroup

C is a relatively rare paternal lineage. The dog populations which bear C are a disparate bunch. The Akita and Shiba Inu are Japanese breeds, the former of which seems to have roots in the Jomon population of hunter-gatherers which were present in the islands of Japan before the ancestors of the modern Japanese arrived. The New Guinea Singing Dog, Samoyed, and Alaska Malamute are all disparate breeds that also represent the C lineage. One village dog from Peru also bore this lineage. This wide distribution and diversity suggest C is not a recently expanded lineage. It likely represents a canid lineage which diversified sometime around the Last Glacial Maximum, when the dogs of Siberia and Oceania split off and went their separate ways.

Hb.1

MELBOURNE’s Haplotype

Part of the C haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in New Guinea Singing Dog.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The Shiba Inu descends from this relativey rare haplogroup.