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Fennec Fox Mohler

Southeast Asian Island Village Dog

“Born in 2014 on Jaco Island in Timor-Leste. Likely the only dog ever to live in the U.S. from Timor-Leste. Fenec was discovered by tourists on the Island with no mother or father and destined to die. The tourists brought him back to a vet In the capital of Dili. The vet provided the care he could until I adopted him. He is my best friend and I could not leave him behind. After two years together there, He returned to the U.S. with me and became a U.S. citizen in September 2016.”

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Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Southeast Asian Island Village Dog

What exactly are village dogs?

Village dogs are the free-breeding, free-roaming “outside” dogs found around the world living in and around human settlements big and small. They are also known as island dogs, pariah dogs, or free-ranging dogs.

Many village dog populations precede the formation of modern breed dogs.

They make up about 3/4s of the billion or so dogs living on Earth today. They serve as trash cleaners, sentinels, and even sometimes companions while still retaining much of their freedom. Embark’s founders have studied village dogs on six continents since 2007 in their efforts to understand the history, traits, and health of the domestic dog. Through this work they have discovered the origins of the dog in Central Asia, and also identified genetic regions involved in domestication and local adaptation, such as the high altitude adaptation in Himalayan dogs. Embark is the only dog DNA test that includes diverse village dogs from around the world in its breed reference panel.

So what breeds are in my dog?

In a very real sense, Southeast Asian Island Village Dog is the actual breed of your dog. Village dogs like this descend from separate lines of dogs than the lines that have been bred into standardized breeds like Labradors and Poodles. If you trace the family tree of Fennec Fox Mohler back, you won’t find any ancestral dogs that are part of any of those standardized breeds.

Southeast Asian Island Village Dog Southeast Asian Island Village Dog
Dogs accompanied humans on some of their most fantastic voyages across the Pacific, spreading throughout the islands of Southeast Asia and Oceania. These dogs served as companions, guards, and food animals. Their descendents, mixed with more recent European (dog) arrivals, live on today in islands dotting the Pacific, where they live amongst people, beaches, and palm trees.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
45 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided
Changes to this dog’s profile
Learn More
  • On 9/2/2018 changed name from "His Excellency Fennec Fox Mohler" to "Fennec Fox Mohler"

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Village dogs have lived just about everywhere across the world for thousands of years. Long before there were any recognized dog breeds, there were village dogs around the fires and trash heaps of early human villages. Fennec Fox Mohler is part of this ancient heritage, not descended from a specific breed, but continuing the ancient lineage of dogs that were our first, best friends.

Embark's co-founders studied Village Dogs on six continents in their efforts to understand the history, traits, and health of the domestic dog. Through this work, they discovered evidence for the origins of the dog in Central Asia , and they also identified genetic regions involved in domestication and local adaptation. As a result, Embark has the largest Village Dog reference panel of any canine genetics company.

We compared Fennec Fox Mohler's DNA to a global panel of thousands of village dogs. This plot highlights regions of the world where Fennec Fox Mohler's DNA is most similar to those village dogs. The areas of darkest red reflect the greatest similarity to our village dog panel.

Village Dog Map
Similarity to village dog groups around the world. Darker red reflects greater similarity.

Summary

0
AT RISK
1
CARRIER
169
CLEAR
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Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal

Fennec Fox Mohler has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Fennec Fox Mohler's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Fennec Fox Mohler’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Fennec Fox Mohler did not test positive for any of the genetic conditions that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Fennec Fox Mohler’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future.

Carrier for
1 genetic condition

Fennec Fox Mohler is a carrier for 1 of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
What does Carrier mean?

Fennec Fox Mohler has inherited a recessive allele for a genetic trait or mutation. This is not enough to cause symptoms of the disease, but is important to bear in mind if Fennec Fox Mohler ever has children.

Condition List

Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis, HUU
(SLC2A9)
Kidney and Bladder

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate; if caught early, it is responsive to dietary management. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabol…

Common Conditions

Good news! Fennec Fox Mohler tested clear for 6 other common genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Primary Lens Luxation
(ADAMTS17)
Eyes

This surgically correctable condition causes the lens to spontaneously detach from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity and irritation …

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM1
(PDK4)
Heart

The most common acquired heart disease of dogs, this is a progressive disease of the heart ventricles: early diagnosis and treatment is key. The ventricles are the heavil…

Exercise-Induced Collapse
(DNM1)
Muscular

First characterized in field-trial lines of Labrador Retriever dogs, this muscle disorder can cause episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes collapse; after recovering, …

Other Conditions:
Clear of 163

Fennec Fox Mohler is clear of 163 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Light colored fur (cream to red)
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Likely black colored nose/feet
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
No impact on coat color
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark fur anywhere
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
No impact on coat color
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely long coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Fennec Fox Mohler’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A244

Map

A1a

Fennec Fox Mohler’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A244

Fennec Fox Mohler’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this rare haplotype occurs in dogs with European ancestry.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

Through Fennec Fox Mohler’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2a

Haplotype

Hc.12

Map

A2a

Fennec Fox Mohler’s Haplogroup

A2a is a truly ancient lineage. Unlike the recent upstart A1 lineages which found their way from a few popular European males a couple hundred years ago into many dogs in many breeds, A2a shows ancient roots without major recent expansion. It is likely one of the oldest eastern Eurasian male lineages of dogs, where it has existed for thousands of years. Nowadays, it's commonly found in Tibetan Terriers and Chow Chows as well as in Southeastern Asian village dogs. The Chow Chow seems to have been depicted in sculpture over 2,000 years ago, so this is an ancient lineage indeed, and dogs with it have a long and noble pedigree! Males from this lineage have continued to be bred in similar forms and breeds for millennia.

Hc.12

Fennec Fox Mohler’s Haplotype

Part of the A2a haplogroup, this rare haplotype occurs in Papua New Guinea and Vietnam.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The large-sized Tibetan Mastiff descends from this ancient lineage.