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Henry

Mixed Breed

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“He's the only 'blonde' pup of a litter of 7. We say his momma ran out of toner as he was the 7th pup to come out. All his siblings are mostly black with brown markings.”

Instagram tag
@princessandthehound

Place of Birth

Plymouth, Minnesota, USA

Current Location

St Paul, Minnesota, USA

From

Midwest Animal Rescue & Services (MARS), 83rd Avenue North, Brooklyn Park, MN, USA

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Genetic Breed Result

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Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from this distant ancestor:

Scottish Terrier

The Scottish Terrier may be small, but the breed earned its nickname “the Diehard” for a reason—they have the attitude and resilience of a true terrier. These sturdy, compact dogs make clever, feisty companions. Their characteristic beard and mustache lend them a dignified expression.

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Dachshund

The Dachshund, meaning “badger dog” in German, is a lively breed with a friendly personality and a great sense of smell. Known for their long and low bodies, they are spirited hunters that excel in both above and below-ground work. They come in three different coat varieties (smooth, wirehaired or longhaired) and can be miniature or standard size.

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Australian Cattle Dog

A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.

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Pomeranian

The Pomeranian is a cocky, animated companion with an extroverted personality.

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Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature Schnauzers are an alert and spirited breed with guard dog tendencies.

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Shih Tzu

This ancient breed is the perfect lapdog. Sweet and easygoing, they want nothing more than to be close to their humans.

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Boxer

Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dog: patient, loyal and smart-requiring lots of exercise and proper training. For active families or owners looking for a rambunctious jogging buddy, Boxers may be the perfect breed. Boxers delight their humans with their sense of humor and affectionate nature.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

0.3 % LOW

Predicted Adult Weight

28 lbs

Genetic Age
32 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

Dogs Like Henry

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Henry. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Scottish Terrier
Dachshund
Australian Cattle Dog
Pomeranian
Miniature Schnauzer
Shih Tzu
Boxer
Supermutt

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Henry
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Mixed Scottish Terrier / Australian Cattle Dog mix Pomeranian / Dachshund mix Dachshund / Pomeranian mix Scottish Terrier / Australian Cattle Dog mix Scottish Terrier Australian Cattle Dog mix Pomeranian mix Dachshund mix Dachshund mix Pomeranian mix Scottish Terrier mix Australian Cattle Dog mix

Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Henry’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Henry is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

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Henry inherited one copy of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Henry has one copy of an FGF4 retrogene on chromosome 12. In some breeds such as Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds (among others) this variant is found in nearly all dogs. While those breeds are known to have an elevated risk of IVDD, many dogs in those breeds never develop IVDD. For mixed breed dogs and purebreds of other breeds where this variant is not as common, risk for Type I IVDD is greater for individuals with this variant than for similar dogs.

What is Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)?

Type I Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) is a back/spine issue that refers to a health condition affecting the discs that act as cushions between vertebrae. With Type I IVDD, affected dogs can have a disc event where it ruptures or herniates towards the spinal cord. This pressure on the spinal cord causes neurologic signs which can range from a wobbly gait to impairment of movement. Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the relative proportion between a dog’s legs and body, wherein the legs are shorter and the body longer. There are multiple different variants that can cause a markedly chondrodystrophic appearance as observed in Dachshunds and Corgis. However, this particular variant is the only one known to also increase the risk for IVDD.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in Boxers

Von Willebrand Disease Type III, Type III vWD

Identified in Scottish Terriers

Prekallikrein Deficiency

Identified in Shih Tzus

Ligneous Membranitis, LM

Identified in Scottish Terriers

Methemoglobinemia

Identified in Pomeranians

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, rcd3

Identified in Pomeranians

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1

Identified in Dachshunds

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Primary Lens Luxation

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Cystinuria Type II-A

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in Pomeranians

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA, Sanfilippo Syndrome Type A, MPS IIIA

Identified in Dachshunds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 1

Identified in Dachshunds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 2, NCL 2

Identified in Dachshunds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 5, NCL 5

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 8, NCL 8

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Late-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, NCL 12

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome, PMDS

Identified in Miniature Schnauzers

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in Boxers

Narcolepsy

Identified in Dachshunds

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Miniature Schnauzers

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Oculocutaneous Albinism, OCA

Identified in Pomeranians

Hereditary Vitamin D-Resistant Rickets

Identified in Pomeranians

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Dachshunds

Craniomandibular Osteopathy, CMO

Identified in Scottish Terriers

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Henry’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A407

Map

A1b

Henry’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A407

Henry’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, the A407 haplotype occurs most commonly in Middle Eastern Village Dogs. It's a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

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Through Henry’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

Ha.44

Map

A1b

Henry’s Haplogroup

For most of dog history, this haplogroup was probably quite rare. However, a couple hundred years ago it seems to have found its way into a prized male guard dog in Europe who had many offspring, including the ancestors of many European guard breeds such as Doberman Pinchers, St. Bernards, and Great Danes. Despite being rare, many of the most imposing dogs on Earth have it; strangely, so do many Pomeranians! Perhaps this explains why some Poms are so tough, acting like they're ten times their actual size! This lineage is most commonly found in working dogs, in particular guard dogs. With origins in Europe, it spread widely across other regions as Europeans took their dogs across the world.

Ha.44

Henry’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype occurs primarily in Poodles and Belgian Sheepdogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Great Danes and Pomeranians have this in common!

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