Haisley

Mixed Breed

No bio has been provided yet

Place of Birth
Ohio, USA
Current Location
Singapore, Singapore
From
Midwest Animal Rescue & Services (MARS), 83rd Avenue North, Brooklyn Park, MN, USA

This dog has been viewed 680 times and been given 0 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

31.6% Boxer
22.1% Treeing Walker Coonhound
15.3% German Shepherd Dog
15.1% Siberian Husky
8.4% Golden Retriever
3.3% Chow Chow
4.2% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Boxer Boxer
Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dog: patient, loyal and smart-requiring lots of exercise and proper training. For active families or owners looking for a rambunctious jogging buddy, Boxers may be the perfect breed. Boxers delight their humans with their sense of humor and affectionate nature.
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Treeing Walker Coonhound Treeing Walker Coonhound
The Treeing Walker Coonhound is phenomenal hunter and working dog. These hardy hounds were built with unmatched speed and stamina in their respective category. This American breed is mainly used today as a working/hunting dog, but can still make a wonderful companion.
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German Shepherd Dog German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.
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Siberian Husky Siberian Husky
Bred initially in Northern Siberia, the Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog who is quick and light on their feet. Their moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest their Northern heritage. Huskies are very active and energetic and are known for being long distance sled dogs.
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Golden Retriever Golden Retriever
Developed as an ideal hunting retriever, the Golden Retriever's eagerness to please and friendliness has made them an extremely popular family pet.
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Chow Chow Chow Chow
This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. Often aloof and suspicious of strangers, the Chow Chow may not be a cuddle buddy, but for the right person, they are a fiercely loyal companion.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

2.5 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
93 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Haisley’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Boxer
Treeing Walker Coonhound
German Shepherd Dog
Siberian Husky
Golden Retriever
Chow Chow
Supermutt

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.
 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Boxer mix Mixed Boxer Siberian Husky / Boxer mix Treeing Walker Coonhound mix German Shepherd Dog / Golden Retriever mix Boxer Boxer Siberian Husky Boxer mix Treeing Walker Coonhound Treeing Walker Coonhound mix German Shepherd Dog Golden Retriever mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Haisley’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Through Haisley’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A285

Map

A1e

Haisley’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A285

Haisley’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Boxers. It’s a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Haisley inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Haisley is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.