Embark logo

Gunnar

Mixed Breed

“He was a stray picked up by Miami/Dade Fla police, my niece saw him on Facebook and paid to bring him to Chicago, & then another thousand to bring him back from pneumonia and bordatella. He is loving and clever and funny (he's made up his own game). He says "yum yum" only when he wants a treat; rings bells on the door to go out; shares food & toys with my other dog; demands to sleep under the covers; HATES touching water (lets a duck come right up and quack in his face but won't take that one”

Location
Alsip, Illinois, USA
From
Miami-Dade, FL, USA

This dog has been viewed 1017 times and been given 0 wags

Registration

Microchip: 985112004416255

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

50.0% American Bulldog
43.1% Staffordshire Terrier
6.9% German Shepherd Dog
American Bulldog American Bulldog
American bulldogs are enjoying a healthy increase in popularity, either as a working/protector dog or as a family pet. All over the world, they are used variously as "hog dogs" (catching escaped pigs or hunting razorbacks), as cattle drovers and as working or sport K-9s. American Bulldogs also successfully compete in several dog sports such as dog obedience, Iron Dog competition and weight pulling.
Learn More
Staffordshire Terrier Staffordshire Terrier
Staffordshire Terriers, sometimes referred to as "pit bull" type, are intelligent and trainable dogs. They can have a lot of energy and are often great canine athletes!
Learn More
German Shepherd Dog German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence.
Learn More
Start a conversation! Message this dog’s humans.

Genetic Stats


Wolfiness:

1.1 % MEDIUM

Predicted Adult Weight:

48 lbs

Genetic Age:

44 human years

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Gunnar’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
American Bulldog
Staffordshire Terrier
German Shepherd Dog

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Gunnar’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely light to moderate shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance

Through Gunnar’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A248

Map

A1d

Gunnar’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A248

Gunnar’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, this haplotype has been detected in village dogs in French Polynesia and Colombia. Among breeds, it occurs in Jack Russell Terriers, Fox Terrier Wires, and Cocker Spaniels.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

Through Gunnar’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

H7

Map

D

Gunnar’s Haplogroup

The D paternal lineage is very common in well-known populations of dogs. Breeds belonging to the D lineage likely have direct male ancestors that can be traced all the way back to the origin of domestic dogs themselves! One popular breed that commonly sports a D lineage is the Boxer. Boxers were developed in the late 19th century from Mastiff dogs, so it is no surprise that D is well represented among Mastiffs, Bulldogs, as well as Terriers. Intriguingly, D is also found among Lhasa Apsos, an ancient Tibetan breed, and Afghan Hounds. While the presence of this lineage in Polynesia or the New World can be chalked up to interbreeding with European dogs brought during voyages of discovery or later settlement, D is also well represented among village dog populations in the Middle East and Africa. If the fact that we find dogs bearing a D lineage in the Middle East (not to mention the large amount of diversity among Middle Eastern D lineage males) is any indication of ancient residence in that region, then the presence among Oceanian village dogs is peculiar. Rather, it may be that D is part of a broader Eurasian group of ancient paternal lineages which disappeared from the eastern portion of its original range, persisting in the island of New Guinea as well as West Asia and Africa. With the rise of Mastiff breeds, the D lineage received a new life as it became common among many types of working dogs.

H7

Gunnar’s Haplotype

Part of the D haplogroup, this common haplotype has been found in French Bulldogs, Afghan Hounds, Bull Terriers, and village dogs spanning from South America to Africa and into the South Pacific.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The D paternal lineage is common in Boxers.