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Gilly

Mixed Breed

“We found Gilly as a stray when she was only about 7 weeks old. She came from an area near Monument Valley called Kayenta, Arizona. We found her just outside the Indian reservations in that area. As of December 2019 Gilly is 2 and a half years old! Gilly is maniacally obsessed with the ball and fetch. We discovered this early on and used it to our advantage during her training. She is very well trained and will do/learn/perform just about anything for you if theres a chance she'll get to play f”

Place of Birth
Kayenta, Arizona, USA
Current Location
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
From
Kayenta, Arizona, USA

This dog has been viewed 242 times and been given 1 wag

Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

62.4% Labrador Retriever
10.1% American Pit Bull Terrier
8.3% Australian Cattle Dog
7.9% Siberian Husky
7.4% Alaskan Malamute
3.9% Samoyed
Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever
The Labrador Retriever was bred for hunting and excelled in retrieving game after it was shot down. Known for its gentle disposition and loyalty, the Labrador Retriever has become a favorite of families and breeders alike.
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American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
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Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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Siberian Husky Siberian Husky
Bred initially in Northern Siberia, the Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog who is quick and light on their feet. Their moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest their Northern heritage. Huskies are very active and energetic and are known for being long distance sled dogs.
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Alaskan Malamute Alaskan Malamute
The Alaskan Malamute is a large, fluffy spitz breed recognized as being one of the most ancient breeds of dogs. The forebears to the modern Malamute crossed the Bering Strait with their owners over 4,000 years ago. Their size, thick coat, and work drive make them ideal dogs for pulling sleds, but they also make amicable companions.
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Samoyed Samoyed
A working breed, the Samoyed can be strong-willed at times, but above all they remain friendly, gentle, and devoted family dogs. The Samoyed was originally bred to hunt, haul sledges, and herd reindeer. Among the breed’s duties: pack hiking, tracking, and warming their owners by sleeping on top of them at night.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.8 % HIGH Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Gilly’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Labrador Retriever
American Pit Bull Terrier
Australian Cattle Dog
Siberian Husky
Alaskan Malamute
Samoyed

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever / Australian Cattle Dog mix American Pit Bull Terrier / Siberian Husky mix Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever Australian Cattle Dog mix American Pit Bull Terrier Siberian Husky mix Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Gilly’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Through Gilly’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A268

Map

A1b

Gilly’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A268

Gilly’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1b haplogroup, this uncommon haplotype occurs most frequently in Labrador Retrievers and has been spotted less often in Golden Retrievers, Poodles, and Chihuahuas.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Gilly inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Gilly is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.