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Fritz

Mixed Breed

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“Fritz hails from San Bernadino, but is now a San Diego local who loves long walks on the beach, fresh grass and bacon. He has a master’s degree in cuddling - when he feels like it. Fritz has held a steady job for 7+ yrs at Treeline Interactive as Office Pup. In 2018 Fritz had a surgery for IVDD (& Embark calls out his genetic proneness) but recovered well! Fritz is a picky eater, slow walker w/ a bit of a stubbornness, but honestly, he's the perfect 4-legged family member anyone could ask for.”

Instagram tag
@fritzstagramz

Current Location

San Diego, California, USA

From

San Bernardino, CA, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 2 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Mixed Breed

Chihuahua

Chihuahuas have a huge personality that defies their tiny frame, known to be highly active and intelligent canines.

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Pekingese

Pekingese were dogs bred for centuries to be the prized companions of the imperial family of China. Today they are still cherished family companions and show dogs who greet everyone they meet with dignity and grace.

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Lhasa Apso

An independent breed, the Lhasa's goal in life is not necessarily to please their master. The Lhasa Apso is a small, hardy breed with a beautiful cloak of hair that parts down the back from head to tail. Their temperament is unique: joyful and mischievous, dignified and aloof. Popular in the show ring, the breed also excels at activities that provide constant challenges, such as agility.

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Yorkshire Terrier

Petite but proud, the Yorkshire terrier is a popular toy breed with a silky, low-shedding coat.

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Biewer Terrier

The Biewer Terrier is one of the smallest Terriers within the Toy Group, only 7-8 inches tall and typically less than 8 pounds. In spite of the small size, the Biewer is known as a robust and athletic dog.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM

Predicted Adult Weight

11 lbs

Genetic Age
69 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

Dogs Like Fritz

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Fritz. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Chihuahua
Pekingese
Lhasa Apso
Yorkshire Terrier
Biewer Terrier

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Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 2/16/2021 changed handle from "fritz132" to "fritznocero"

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Fritz
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Chihuahua mix Pekingese mix Chihuahua Yorkshire Terrier / Biewer Terrier mix Pekingese Lhasa Apso / Chihuahua mix Chihuahua Chihuahua Yorkshire Terrier Biewer Terrier mix Pekingese Pekingese Lhasa Apso Chihuahua

Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Fritz’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Fritz is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

And inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

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Fritz inherited both copies of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Fritz has two copies of an FGF4 retrogene on chromosome 12. In some breeds such as Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds (among others) this variant is found in nearly all dogs. While those breeds are known to have an elevated risk of IVDD, many dogs in those breeds never develop IVDD. For mixed breed dogs and purebreds of other breeds where this variant is not as common, risk for Type I IVDD is greater for individuals with this variant than for similar dogs.

What is Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)?

Type I Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) is a back/spine issue that refers to a health condition affecting the discs that act as cushions between vertebrae. With Type I IVDD, affected dogs can have a disc event where it ruptures or herniates towards the spinal cord. This pressure on the spinal cord causes neurologic signs which can range from a wobbly gait to impairment of movement. Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the relative proportion between a dog’s legs and body, wherein the legs are shorter and the body longer. There are multiple different variants that can cause a markedly chondrodystrophic appearance as observed in Dachshunds and Corgis. However, this particular variant is the only one known to also increase the risk for IVDD.

ALT Activity

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Fritz inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Fritz has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Fritz's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Fritz’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Biewer Terriers, Chihuahuas, and more

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 1, GR-PRA1

Identified in Lhasa Apsos

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1

Identified in Chihuahuas

Primary Lens Luxation

Identified in Biewer Terriers and Yorkshire Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 7, NCL 7

Identified in Chihuahuas

Spinocerebellar Ataxia with Myokymia and/or Seizures

Identified in Chihuahuas

Oculocutaneous Albinism, OCA

Identified in Lhasa Apsos and Pekingese

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Dark brown pigment
Cocoa
No impact on fur and skin color
Red Pigment Intensity LINKAGE
I (Intensity) Loci
Any light fur likely yellow or tan
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have large white areas in coat
Roan LINKAGE
R (Roan) Locus
Likely no impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Intermediate
Body Size 3
Smaller
Body Size 4
Smaller
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation
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Through Fritz’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A628

Map

A1d

Fritz’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A628

Fritz’s Haplotype

Part of the A1d haplogroup, the A628 haplotype occurs most commonly in American Foxhounds. It's a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

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Through Fritz’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

H7.5

Map

D

Fritz’s Haplogroup

The D paternal lineage is very common in well-known populations of dogs. Breeds belonging to the D lineage likely have direct male ancestors that can be traced all the way back to the origin of domestic dogs themselves! One popular breed that commonly sports a D lineage is the Boxer. Boxers were developed in the late 19th century from Mastiff dogs, so it is no surprise that D is well represented among Mastiffs, Bulldogs, as well as Terriers. Intriguingly, D is also found among Lhasa Apsos, an ancient Tibetan breed, and Afghan Hounds. While the presence of this lineage in Polynesia or the New World can be chalked up to interbreeding with European dogs brought during voyages of discovery or later settlement, D is also well represented among village dog populations in the Middle East and Africa. If the fact that we find dogs bearing a D lineage in the Middle East (not to mention the large amount of diversity among Middle Eastern D lineage males) is any indication of ancient residence in that region, then the presence among Oceanian village dogs is peculiar. Rather, it may be that D is part of a broader Eurasian group of ancient paternal lineages which disappeared from the eastern portion of its original range, persisting in the island of New Guinea as well as West Asia and Africa. With the rise of Mastiff breeds, the D lineage received a new life as it became common among many types of working dogs.

H7.5

Fritz’s Haplotype

Part of the D haplogroup, the H7.5 haplotype occurs most commonly in Lhasa Apsos. We've also spotted it in Southeast Asian Village Dogs and East Asian Village Dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The D paternal lineage is common in Boxers.

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