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Farley

Mixed Breed

“He was supposedly 3/4 Keeshond and 1/4 Husky. We got him from a couple in Salt Lake City at 4 months old. He loves any activities with humans and loves to swim but is scared of the waves in the ocean. He is super smart and usually catches on to new somewhat simple tasks in 2 or 3 attempts.”

Place of Birth
Idaho, USA
Current Location
San Diego, California, USA
From
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

This dog has been viewed 66 times and been given 0 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

29.1% Keeshond
27.0% Norwegian Elkhound
23.0% Siberian Husky
20.9% Border Collie
Keeshond Keeshond
The Keeshond is one of the friendlies dogs out there. They appear to have a permenant smile on their face. They were originally bred as watchdogs in Holland, but now serve a lovable companions in the home.
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Norwegian Elkhound Norwegian Elkhound
The Norwegian Elkhound was the main companion of the Vikings. These guys have been used in almost every role imaginable for a dog. In modern times, they are primarily companion dogs, but they are still used for hunting and herding.
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Siberian Husky Siberian Husky
Bred initially in Northern Siberia, the Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog who is quick and light on their feet. Their moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest their Northern heritage. Huskies are very active and energetic and are known for being long distance sled dogs.
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Border Collie Border Collie
Border Collies are highly energetic and work oriented herding dogs, whose stamina is matched by their intelligence and alertness. If you want the smartest dog out there, then you have come to the right place!
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

2.8 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
16 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Farley’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Keeshond
Norwegian Elkhound
Siberian Husky
Border Collie

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Keeshond mix Norwegian Elkhound / Siberian Husky mix Keeshond Border Collie mix Norwegian Elkhound Siberian Husky Keeshond Keeshond Border Collie Border Collie mix Norwegian Elkhound Norwegian Elkhound Siberian Husky Siberian Husky

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Farley’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

0
AT RISK
2
CARRIER
170
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal

Farley has two copies of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity. Please inform your veterinarian that Farley has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Farley is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Farley’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Farley did not test positive for any of the genetic conditions that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Farley’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future.

Carrier for
2 genetic conditions

Farley is a carrier for 2 of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
What does Carrier mean?

Farley has inherited a recessive allele for a genetic trait or mutation. This is not enough to cause symptoms of the disease, but is important to bear in mind if Farley ever has children.

Condition List

Collie Eye Anomaly, Choroidal Hypoplasia, CEA
(NHEJ1)
Eyes

Named for its high prevalence in Collie dogs, Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) is more correctly termed choroidal hypoplasia and is a developmental disease of the choroid. The ch…

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Common Conditions

Good news! Farley tested clear for 8 genetic conditions that are common in his breed mix.
Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Farley.

Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome
(VPS13B)
Blood

Dogs with TNS are prone to recurrent bacterial infections that must be recognized and treated early. Neutrophils, a type of white blood cells, are generated in the bone m…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Farley.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Norwegian Elkhounds, but not Farley.

Glaucoma
Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (ADAMTS10 Exon 9)
Eyes

A disease that affects humans and dogs alike; this is an adult-onset, medically manageable condition that causes high intraocular pressure (IOP). If left untreated, it ca…

Seen in Norwegian Elkhounds, but not Farley.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 1
(CLN5 Border Collie Variant)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Farley.

GM1 Gangliosidosis
(GLB1 Exon 15 Alaskan Husky Variant)
Multisystem

An early onset form of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause affected dogs to display neurologic signs as puppies or young adults. These include partial or total visi…

Seen in Siberian Huskys, but not Farley.

Myotonia Congenita
(CLCN1 Exon 23)
Muscular

This condition is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction and stiffness that usually resolves with normal exercise, though physical therapy can be beneficial. The g…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Farley.

Imerslund-Grasbeck Syndrome, Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption
(CUBN Exon 53)
Gastrointestinal

This is a treatable gastrointestinal disease where dogs cannot absorb cobalamin, often causing them to be runty with poor energy levels. Cobalamin is required for synthes…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Farley.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 162

Farley is clear of 162 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Agouti (Wolf Sable) coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Likely to have blue eyes or partial blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Intermediate
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance

Through Farley’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A313

Map

A1b

Farley’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A313

Farley’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1b haplogroup, we see this haplotype most frequently in Keeshonds. It’s a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

Through Farley’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A

Haplotype

Hc.1

Map

A

Farley’s Haplogroup

A is the distant relative of some of the most numerous paternal lineages in the world. Characterized by a single sub-lineage, this is a rare and interesting paternal line! The A line is found most commonly in Siberian Huskies and in Alaskan village dogs. It seems plausible that this paternal lineage diverged within the last 10,000 years from a group arriving with the first Arctic explorers. The recent ancestors of dogs with this lineage actually allowed humans to survive in some of the most forbidding conditions on the face of the earth!

Hc.1

Farley’s Haplotype

The lone member of the A haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Siberian Huskies and village dogs from Alaska.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Siberian Huskys are the only breed to have the A haplogroup.