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Dinah

Mixed Breed

“I adopted her as an 8 week old puppy in 2011. Someone brought Husky mother into the vet and surrendered her and her unborn puppies for adoption. She’s high energy, loves people and dogs, hates cats and small animals (very high prey drive). She “talks” like a husky. She’s very emotionally connected to me & it feels like she can read my mind. She has short coat but it’s thick and soft like a bunny and she has 1 full blue, 1 half blue/brown eye! She has 4 declaws”

Place of Birth
Betty Baugh's Animal Clinic, Patterson Avenue, Richmond, VA, USA
Current Location
Glen Allen, Virginia, USA
From
Betty Baugh's Animal Clinic, Patterson Avenue, Richmond, VA, USA

This dog has been viewed 62 times

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

50.0% Siberian Husky
28.7% American Pit Bull Terrier
21.3% American Staffordshire Terrier
Siberian Husky Siberian Husky
Bred initially in Northern Siberia, the Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog who is quick and light on their feet. Their moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest their Northern heritage. Huskies are very active and energetic and are known for being long distance sled dogs.
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American Pit Bull Terrier American Pit Bull Terrier
The American Pit Bull Terrier originated in the British Isles and descends from the Mastiff-type dogs introduced to England in antiquity. The breed was brought over to the United States by English immigrants in the 1800s, and quickly became one of the most popular and widespread breeds there.
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American Staffordshire Terrier American Staffordshire Terrier
American Staffordshire Terriers are powerful but playful dogs that are both loyal and affectionate with their owners.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.6 % LOW Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Dinah’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Siberian Husky
American Pit Bull Terrier
American Staffordshire Terrier

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Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Dinah’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Through Dinah’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A382

Map

A1a

Dinah’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A382

Dinah’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and Chesapeake Bay Retrievers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Dinah inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Dinah is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.