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Dillinger

Mixed Breed

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No bio has been provided yet

Current Location

Oakland, California, USA

From

East Bay SPCA Oakland Adoption Center, Baldwin Street, Oakland, CA, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 2 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Australian Cattle Dog

A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.

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Russell-type Terrier

These small, energetic terriers, developed in 19th century England for hunting small game, are now some of the best agility dogs around.

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Siberian Husky

Bred initially in Northern Siberia, the Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog who is quick and light on their feet. Their moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest their Northern heritage. Huskies are very active and energetic and are known for being long distance sled dogs.

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German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

3.7 % HIGH

Dogs Like Dillinger

Venn diagram

Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Dillinger. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Australian Cattle Dog
Russell-type Terrier
Siberian Husky
German Shepherd Dog
Supermutt

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Dillinger
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Australian Cattle Dog mix Australian Cattle Dog mix Siberian Husky / German Shepherd Dog mix Australian Cattle Dog Russell-type Terrier mix Australian Cattle Dog Mixed Siberian Husky German Shepherd Dog mix Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog Russell-type Terrier Russell-type Terrier mix

Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Dillinger’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Through Dillinger’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2

Haplotype

A29a

Map

A2

Dillinger’s Haplogroup

A2 is a very ancient maternal line. Most likely it was one of the major female lines that contributed to the very first domesticated dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Some of the line stayed in Central Asia to the present day, and frequently appear as Tibetan Mastiffs and Akitas. Those that escaped the mountains of Central Asia sought out other cold spots, and are now found among Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. This lineage is also occasionally found in several common Western breeds, such as German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers. Curiously, all New Guinea Singing Dogs descend from this line. These are an ancient and very interesting breed found in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. Unfortunately, they are now endangered. They are closely related to the Australian dingo, so you could say its cousins are dingos! This line is also common in village dogs in Southeast and East Asia. Unlike many other lineages, A2 did not spread across the whole world, probably because it did not have the opportunity to hitch its wagon to European colonialism - or because these dogs just prefer hanging out in mountains, tundras, islands, and other hard-to-reach places!

A29a

Dillinger’s Haplotype

Part of the A2 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Siberian Huskies, Alaskan Malamutes, Labrador Retrievers, and village dogs from Alaska.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dingos commonly possess this haplogroup.

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Through Dillinger’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.22

Map

A1a

Dillinger’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.22

Dillinger’s Haplotype

Part of the A1a haplogroup, the H1a.22 haplotype occurs most commonly in Chinese Cresteds and Chihuahuas. We've also spotted it in American Village Dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

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