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“Delft”
Ch Featherstones's Nightbird's Song of Zimzala FQ (DMA) CGC(Go)

Flat-Coated Retriever

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“Delft is a Flatcoated Retriever who enjoys working in Obedience, Field Trials and Trick dog training”

Place of Birth

Leeuwarden, Friesland, Netherlands

Current Location

Stellenbosch, Western Cape, South Africa

From

Leeuwarden, Netherlands

This dog has been viewed and been given 0 wags

Registration

N/A : ZA001028C17

Genetic Breed Result

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Flat-Coated Retriever

The Flat-Coated Retriever is an active, multitalented bird dog with a strong desire to please people

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Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 12/31/2021 changed name from "Delft - Ch Featherstones's Nightbird's Song of Zimzala FQ (DMA) CGC(Go)" to "Ch Featherstones's Nightbird's Song of Zimzala FQ (DMA) CGC(Go)"

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Health Summary

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Delft inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Bald Thigh Syndrome

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Delft inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Because this variant is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner (meaning dogs need two copies of the variant to develop the disease), Delft is unlikely to develop this condition due to the variant.

Impact on Breeding

Your dog carries this variant and will pass it on to ~50% of her offspring. You can email breeders@embarkvet.com to discuss with a genetic counselor how the genotype results should be applied to a breeding program.

What is Bald Thigh Syndrome?

A cosmetic condition common to sighthounds characterized by hair loss on the thighs. It is caused by a structural abnormality of the hair follicle.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Additional Genetic Conditions

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Delft’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A388

Map

A1a

Ch Featherstones's Nightbird's Song of Zimzala FQ (DMA) CGC(Go)’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A388

Ch Featherstones's Nightbird's Song of Zimzala FQ (DMA) CGC(Go)’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Staffordshire Terriers, Labrador Retrievers, and English Bulldogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Delft inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Delft is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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