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Dakota

Australian Shepherd Group

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No bio has been provided yet

Instagram tag
@caninekota

Place of Birth

Cheboygan, MI, USA

Current Location

Prince George, Virginia, USA

From

Traverse City, MI, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 48 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Dakota

Dakota

Australian Shepherd Group
100.0% Australian Shepherd

Australian Shepherd

Australian Shepherds are an energetic mid-sized breed that make the perfect companion.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM

Predicted Adult Weight

63 lbs

Genetic Age
40 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Australian Shepherd

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Health Summary

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Good news!

Dakota is not at increased risk for the genetic health conditions that Embark tests.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy, cmr1

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Hereditary Cataracts

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 6, NCL 6

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 8, NCL 8

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Craniomandibular Osteopathy, CMO

Identified in Australian Shepherds and Australian Shepherds

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Red Pigment Intensity LINKAGE
I (Intensity) Loci
No impact on coat pattern
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have some white areas in coat
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Likely to appear merle or "phantom merle"
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely long coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Larger
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation
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Through Dakota’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A226

Map

A1e

Dakota’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A226

Dakota’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we have spotted this haplotype in village dogs in Central and South America and Papua New Guinea. Among the 10 breeds we have detected it in, we see it most frequently in Border Collies, Doberman Pinschers, and Samoyeds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

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Through Dakota’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.46

Map

A1a

Dakota’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.46

Dakota’s Haplotype

Part of the A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

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