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Daisy

Boxer

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“petite boxer baby”

Place of Birth

Riverside, CA, USA

Current Location

Los Angeles, California, USA

From

Riverside, CA, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 2 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Boxer

Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dog: patient, loyal and smart-requiring lots of exercise and proper training. For active families or owners looking for a rambunctious jogging buddy, Boxers may be the perfect breed. Boxers delight their humans with their sense of humor and affectionate nature.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM

Predicted Adult Weight

53 lbs

Genetic Age
36 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

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Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Daisy’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Daisy inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

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Daisy inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Degenerative Myelopathy, DM?

The dog equivalent of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, DM is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord. Because the nerves that control the hind limbs are the first to degenerate, the most common clinical signs are back muscle wasting and gait abnormalities.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Hemophilia A

Identified in Boxers

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Daisy’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A579

Map

A1d

Daisy’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A579

Daisy’s Haplotype

Part of the A1d haplogroup, the A579 haplotype occurs most commonly in Boxers. It's a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Daisy inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Daisy is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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